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Culturekiosque Travel Tips  •  Art and Archaeology: Current Listings

Events in Australia

Gods, Myths and Mortals: Greek Treasures Across the Millennia from the Benaki Museum
MELBOURNE  •  Hellenic Museum of Melbourne  •  10 September 2014 - 10 October 2019
 

The exhibition: Gods, Myths and Mortals: Greek Treasures Across the Millennia from the Benaki Museum, offers a manageable, yet complete, picture of the span of Greek civilisation. 

It highlights the unbroken continuation and unity of Hellenism, from earliest prehistory to the Classical and Hellenistic years, from the Roman era to the end of the Byzantine period, and from the centuries of foreign rule up to the revolutionary revival of 1821, and the founding of the Modern Greek state. The captivating progression of Greek art, and the twists and turns of Greece’s history are narrated by representative objects from almost eight millennia, coming as much from Greece itself as from lands where Greek culture took hold. At this crossroads between Europe, Africa and Asia, man – despite long periods of unrest and insecurity – managed to maintain the essential components of his civilisation: an anthropocentric view of the world, lively and inspirational thinking and the fruitful assimilation of as many influences as were accepted from its conquerors over time. 

In the exhibition of the Benaki Museum, aspects of everyday life and different sides of religious expression are presented together with documents about the social and political organisation, in order to record the narrative that can be read within the development of Greek civilisation. 



Hellenic Museum of Melbourne Website


Contact:

Hellenic Museum of Melbourne
280 William Street
Melbourne VIC 3000
Australia


Tel: 61 3 8615 9016

Events in Belgium

Birgit Jürgenssen
BRUSSELS  •  Gladstone Gallery  •  23 October - 22 December 2018
 
Gladstone Gallery is presenting an exhibition of works by Austrian artist Birgit Jürgenssen, featuring drawings and sculptures from the 1970s and 80s. Her practice explores the representation of women’s psychic lives as refracted by the dominant systems of labor and commodity. These works illustrate not only the facility with which Jürgenssen engaged with various media, but also exemplify her rigorous commitment to conflating Structuralism and feminist critique with the visual markers of Surrealism. Either as the direct subject in autobiographical self-portraits or the engaged chronicler of both the fantastic and the everyday, Jürgenssen questions accepted constructions of gender through depictions of the female body, sex, and the art historical canon that are both playfully humorous and bitingly critical.

Birgit Jürgenssen was born in 1949 in Vienna where she lived and worked for most of her life until she died in 2003. She is the subject of a solo exhibition I am that opens in November 2018 at Kunsthalle Tübingen, Germany, before traveling to GAMeC, Bergamo, Italy and LOUISIANA Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk, Denmark.

Gladstone Gallery Website


Contact: Gladstone Gallery
12 Rue du Grand Cerf
Brussels, Belgium 1000
Tel: (32) 2 513 35 31

Events in Canada

Alexander Calder (1898-1976),<EM> Aluminum Leaves, Red Post</EM>, 1941, sheet metal, wire and paint. The Lipman Family Foundation. © 2018 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SOCAN, Montreal. Photo courtesy Whitney Museum, New York.
Alexander Calder (1898-1976), Aluminum Leaves, Red Post, 1941, sheet metal, wire and paint. The Lipman Family Foundation. © 2018 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SOCAN, Montreal. Photo courtesy Whitney Museum, New York.
Alexander Calder: Radical Inventor
MONTREAL  •  Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal  •  21 September 2018 - 24 February 2019
 

The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts presents the first Canadian retrospective of Alexander Calder (1898-1976), showcasing the full scope of the career of the American who set art in motion. The fruit of in-depth research, this major exhibition sheds new light on Calder’s work, as seen through the perspective of innovation.

Developed, organized and circulated by the MMFA, the exhibition Alexander Calder: Radical Inventor brings together over 150 works (paintings, sculptures, jewellery and other graphic works) to give the public an appreciation of the true extent of Calder’s extraordinarily innovative multidisciplinary practice: from his wire portraits to his paintings, and from his invention of the mobile to his monumental sculptures. Over the course of an international career that spanned half a century, this artist exhibited on five continents and worked in an astonishing array of fields, including drawing, sculpture, painting, design and performance.

Among the 150 objects on display are numerous works and documents that have rarely or never been presented and have been specially restored for the exhibition: the sculptures The Brass Family (1929), on loan from the Whitney Museum of American Art; Kiki de Montparnasse (II) (1930), on loan from the Centre Pompidou, Paris; White Panel (1936), on loan from the Calder Foundation; and the mobile Red Gongs (1950), on loan from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, to name but a few. Alexander Calder: Radical Inventor also reveals little-known sculptures made by the artist in his childhood.



Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal Website


Contact: Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal
1380, rue Sherbrooke Ouest
Montréal, Quebec
Canada
Tel: (1) 514 790 12 45

Events in England

Kiluanji Kia Henda: <EM>The Last Journey of the Dictator Mussunda N’zombo Before the Great Extinction: Act I</EM>, 2017
Kiluanji Kia Henda: The Last Journey of the Dictator Mussunda N'zombo Before the Great Extinction: Act I, 2017
Africa State of Mind
NOTTINGHAM  •  New Art Exchange  •  29 September - 16 December 2018
 

Africa State of Mind, curated by Ekow Eshun with NAE, explores the work of an emergent generation of photographers from across the African continent. 16 artists from 11 different countries interrogate ideas of 'Africanness' through highly subjective renderings of life and identity on the continent, along the way revealing Africa to be a psychological space as much as a physical territory; a state of mind as much as a physical location. The exhibiting artists are: Emmanuelle Andrianjafy, Sammy Baloji, Raphaël Barontini, Neil Beloufa, Girma Berta, Eric Gyamfi, Kiluanji Kia Henda, Lebohang Kganye, Namsa Leuba, Michael MacGarry, Sabelo Mlangeni, Mimi Cherono Ng'ok, Musa N Nxumalo, Ruth Ossai, Athi Patra Ruga and Michael Tsegaye.

The exhibition orientates around three main themes - Inner Landscapes, Zones of Freedom and Hybrid Cities. In the show the modern African city is documented in all its dynamism and contradiction. The fluidity of gender and sexual identity is addressed through compelling portraiture, and the legacy of history, from slavery and colonialism to apartheid, becomes the source of new myths and dreamscapes.



New Art Exchange Website


Contact: New Art Exchange
39-41 Gregory Boulevard
Nottingham
NG7 6BE, Uk
Tel: (44) 0115 924 8630

Ashurbanipal
Ashurbanipal
I am Ashurbanipal: king of the world, king of Assyria
LONDON  •  British Museum  •  8 November 2018 - 24 February 2019
 

This autumn, discover the world of ancient Assyria through the life and legacy of its last great ruler, King Ashurbanipal. The BP exhibition I am Ashurbanipal: king of the world, king of Assyria will transport you back to ancient Iraq in the 7th century BC, when Ashurbanipal became the most powerful person on earth. From his capital at Nineveh, he ruled a vast and diverse empire, shaping the lives of peoples from the shores of the eastern Mediterranean to the mountains of western Iran.

How did one man negotiate family politics, the pressures of kingship, and the will of the gods? Ashurbanipal, proud of his scholarship, assembled the greatest library in existence during his reign. Guided by this arsenal of knowledge, he defined the course of the empire and boldly asserted his claim to be ‘king of the world, king of Assyria’.

This is the first ever major exhibition to explore the life of Ashurbanipal in such depth. The exhibition tells Ashurbanipal’s remarkable story through the vivid narratives recorded on his palace sculptures, the hundreds of cuneiform texts that survive from his library, and from the wealth of objects discovered by archaeologists working in the region. Innovative displays bring to life the tumultuous story of Ashurbanipal’s reign; his conquest of Egypt, the crushing defeat of his rebellious older brother, and his ruthless campaigns against all who defied his rule.

Over 200 extraordinary objects from all corners of the empire reveal how one of the greatest Assyrian monarchs stamped an indelible mark on the history of the world. The British Museum’s world-renowned collection of Assyrian treasures have been complemented by key loans from across the globe. These include unique objects and artworks from the collections of the History Museum of Armenia, Yerevan; the Musée du Louvre, Paris; the Vorderasiatisches Museum, in Berlin; the State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg; the Museo Gregoriano Etrusco, Musei Vaticani, Vatican City; and the Cyprus Museum, Nicosia. Many of these remarkable objects have never travelled to the UK before.

The exhibition immerses visitors in the life at the great Assyrian court. Massive stone sculptures, intricately carved reliefs, painted glazed bricks and rare wall paintings evoke the splendour of the cities and palaces. Delicately carved ivories, extravagant metalwork, cosmetic vessels and gold ornaments show how the elites lived in splendour. Ornate chariot fittings and elaborate weaponry reveal how this was an age of conflict, as rival kings fought for power and glory. Ashurbanipal’s prowess as a valiant warrior is recorded on a series of vividly carved reliefs in the British Museum’s collection that depict the royal lion hunt. Lion hunts were drama-filled public spectacles staged within the hunting grounds at Nineveh.

Ashurbanipal claimed to be unlike his predecessors for he could read, write and debate with expert scholars. During his reign he assembled a unique and visionary library at his palace in Nineveh. Knowledge was power; this library was a practical tool that helped the king to manage his empire. Using the British Museum’s world-renowned collection of documents dating to Ashurbanipal’s reign, the exhibition will recreate the king’s great library to evoke its scale and present its contents and significance.

Many of the objects featured in the exhibition come from archaeological sites in Iraq such as Nineveh and Nimrud that have been systematically targeted and destroyed by Daesh (IS). The final section of the exhibition highlights the challenges faced in protecting Iraqi cultural heritage under threat and showcases the work of the ‘Iraq Emergency Heritage Management Training Scheme’. In response to the destruction of heritage sites in Iraq, the British Museum developed this scheme to train Iraqi archaeologists in rescue archaeology and emergency heritage management. An overview of the project’s training and research is being presented to visitors through film footage of the excavations and exclusive interviews with participants.



British Museum Website


Contact: The British Museum
Great Russell Street
London WC1B 3DG
Tel: 44 (0)20 7323 8000

Events in Finland

<P>Gilbert &amp; George, <EM>BEARD RUN</EM> from "THE BEARD PICTURES," 2016. © Gilbert &amp; GeorgeCourtesy White Cube.</P>

Gilbert & George, BEARD RUN from "THE BEARD PICTURES," 2016.
© Gilbert & George
Courtesy White Cube.

Gilbert & George: THE MAJOR EXHIBITION
HELSINKI  •  Helsinki Art Museum  •  12 October 2018 - 24 February 2019
 

HAM Helsinki Art Museum continues its focus of exhibiting internationally renowned contemporary artists with Gilbert & George: THE MAJOR EXHIBITION. It is their first significant exhibition held in the Nordic countries during the last two decades and showcases pictures exhibited for the first time in Finland.

THE MAJOR EXHIBITION consists over 50 pictures created between 1991 and 2016, consisting pictures from 10 major groups of pictures including "NEW DEMOCRATIC PICTURES," "NAKED SHIT PICTURES," "JACK FREAK PICTURES," "SCAPEGOATING PICTURES" and "UTOPIAN PICTURES." The most represented pictures in this exhibition series are from their most recent "THE BEARD PICTURES," which includes the extraordinary triptych OLD BEARD RUIN (2016) of over 20 metres in length.



Helsinki Art Museum Website


Contact:

HAM Tennis Palace
Eteläinen Rautatiekatu 8
00100 Helsinki
Finland

 


Tel: 358 (0)9 310 1051

Events in France

Dorothea Lange: The Politics of Seeing
PARIS  •  Jeu de Paume  •  16 October 2018 - 27 January 2019
 
The Politics of Seeing features major works by the world famous American photographer Dorothea Lange (1895, Hoboken, New Jersey–1966, San Francisco, California), some of which have never
before been exhibited in France. The exhibition focuses on the extraordinary emotional power of Dorothea Lange’s work and on the context of her documentary practice. It features five specific series:
the Depression period (1933-1934), a selection of works from the Farm Security Administration (1935-1939), the Japanese American internment (1942), the Richmond shipyards (1942-1944) and a series
on a Public defender (1955-1957). Over one hundred splendid vintage prints taken between 1933 and 1957 are enhanced by the presence of documents and screenings broadening the scope of an oeuvre often familiar to the public through images such as White Angel Breadline (1933) and
Migrant Mother (1936), which are icons of photographic history.

The majority of prints in this exhibition belong to the Oakland Museum of California, where Lange’s considerable archive, donated to the museum after
her death by her husband Paul Shuster Taylor, is conserved.

Jeu de Paume Website


Contact: Jeu de Paume
Place de la Concorde
Paris

Events in Germany

CALLOT: Graphic Monuments
MANNHEIM  •  Kunsthalle Mannheim  •  14 September - 25 November 2018
 

He is a master of the art of etching: Jacques Callot (Nancy 1592–1635) is considered to be one of the most important late Mannerist copper engravers of the early 17th century. He worked for Cosimo di Medici in Florence and later for the courts in Lorraine and Paris, the Netherlands and Spain. That he achieved international fame – as an artist without any paintings, but exclusively as a result of his etchings – is quite remarkable.

Callot loved theatrical grotesques and elegant court scenes, while setting new standards with his war scenes from the Thirty Years’ War. His works thrive on his inexhaustible attention to detail which the etcher has lent a captivating presence, and – despite their small size – monumentality. In order to achieve this level of precision in his pictures Callot invented new etching techniques as well as employing stage-by-stage acid treatment processes for the first time to generate previously unseen spatial atmospheric effects.

Thematically, Jacques Callot also stroke a new path. With his “Capriccios“, or “Caprices”, he created a new genre which, in a playful manner, broke with iconographic rules, enabling an unchained expression of imaginative ideas.

Jacques Callot became famous for his partly literal, partly dramatic depictions of “The Miseries and Misfortunes of War” which represent one of the first series of works addressing this theme. This form was later taken up by numerous artists. The most famous works include Goya’s “The Disasters of War” and the series “The War” by Otto Dix. Instead of celebrating the victories of the rulers, Callot’s pictures depict the possible misconduct of the soldiers and describe the resulting punishments.

Both, his large format siege pictures as well as his topographically accurate landscapes reveal that the artist was less interested in politically important scenes or prominent buildings rather than the harsh as well as cheerful people’s everyday life.

His oeuvre encompasses 1,428 sheets, of which over one third, consisting of over 500 etchings, is part of the Mannheim art collection.



Kunsthalle Mannheim Website


Contact:

Kunsthalle Mannheim
4 Friedrichsplatz
Mannheim, 68165
Germany



Events in Greece

6th Athens Biennale 2018
ATHENS  •  Various venues  •  26 October - 9 December 2018
 
 

Sited just a few steps from the city's central Syntagma Square, the 6th Athens Biennale explores how opposition plays out today in the political, social and cultural arenas. ANTI takes place in four iconic venues around Kolokotroni Square: the TTT building (Telecommunications, Telegrams and Post), formerly housing the Hellenic Telecommunications Organization OTE, designed by the architect Anastasios Metaxas in 1930 (Stadiou 15), the four-star Esperia Palace Hotel, whose operation suddenly stopped in 2010 (Stadiou 22), the historical Benakeios Library, property of the Hellenic Parliament (Anthimou Gazi 2) and the former offices of the fund of retired engineers and contractors of the public sector, TSMEDE (Kolokotroni 4).

In the exhibition, more than 100 Greek and international contemporary artists map cultural expressions of antagonism in the digital world, post-truth nihilism and conspiracy theories, critiquing through their works the pleasure, the indulgence and the discomfort of ANTI, while proposing various instead-ofs. The exhibition highlights contemporary role play in games as well as our digital selves, analyzes popular desires for opposition and explores ways out of the dialectics of ANTI.

The 6th Athens Biennale ANTI, curated by Stefanie Hessler, Poka-Yio and Kostis Stafylakis, is dedicated to the memory of the LGTBQ activist and performer Zak Kostopoulos / Zackie Oh, who had collaborated with the Biennale on several occasions in the past.



6th Athens Biennale 2018 Website


Contact: Athens Biennale
7 Pidnas Str. 11855,
Athens
Tel: 30 210 5232 222

Events in Italy

Osvaldo Licini: <EM>Self-portrait,</EM> 1913.Oil on cardboard, 37 x 29 cm. Collezione Lorenzo Licini © Osvaldo Licini, by SIAE 2018.
Osvaldo Licini: Self-portrait, 1913.
Oil on cardboard, 37 x 29 cm.
Collezione Lorenzo Licini
© Osvaldo Licini, by SIAE 2018.
Osvaldo Licini: Let Sheer Folly Sweep Me Away
VENICE  •  Peggy Guggenheim Collection  •  22 September 2018 - 14 January 2019
 
 
At the twenty-ninth Venice Biennale in 1958, an artist from the Italian region of the Marches, Osvaldo Licini (1894–1958) was awarded the Grand Prize for painting, a homage to one of the most original and elusive personalities of the Italian art scene of the first half of the twentieth century. Sixty years after that important recognition and his death, the Peggy Guggenheim Collection commemorates the great master with the long-awaited retrospective Osvaldo Licini: Let Sheer Folly Sweep Me Away, curated by Luca Massimo Barbero. Eleven exhibition galleries and over one hundred works retrace the disruptive and tormented artistic path of this artist, whose career was characterized by moments of crisis and seemingly sudden stylistic changes.

Peggy Guggenheim Collection Website


Contact: Peggy Guggenheim Collection
704 Dorsoduro
30123 Venice

Prototypology: An Index of Process and Mutation
ROME  •  Gagosian Gallery Rome  •  14 January - 2 April 2016
 
 

Prototypology explores research and development in the work of thirty contemporary artists, tracing the evolution from idea to finished artwork through drawings, archives, maquettes, and bricolage. In doing so the exhibition establishes a typology of diverse drafts.

The studio is a liminal zone for sourcing, modifying, and testing. Derived from the Italian word schizzare (splash), a "sketch" represents the initial impulse from mind to hand, the developmental process whereby form begins to emerge. In the laboratory of the studio, bricolage is often used as an instinctual method in the construction of prototypes.

The exhibition includes new works and archival material from Michael Heizer, Takashi Murakami, Albert Oehlen, and Robert Therrien, among other artists. Studies for sculptures by Dan Graham, Claes Oldenburg, Tatiana Trouvé, and Rachel Whiteread reveal moments of process that lead to epiphanies. Monumental, civic, everyday, and otherworldly gestures are visible in a range of preparatory drawings and proposals.

Artists: Vladimir Arkhipov, Richard Artschwager, Nina Beier, Will Boone, Mike Bouchet, Chris Burden, Jason Dodge, Aleksandra Domanović, Dan Graham, Loris Gréaud, Michael Heizer, Carsten Höller, Thomas Houseago, Allan McCollum, Takashi Murakami, Albert Oehlen, Claes Oldenburg, Steven Parrino, Giuseppe Penone, Kirsten Pieroth, Ry Rocklen, Nancy Rubins, Arcangelo Sassolino, David Smith, Rudolf Stingel, Robert Therrien, Mungo Thomson, Tatiana Trouvé, Cy Twombly, Rachel Whiteread



Gagosian Gallery Rome Website


Contact: Gagosian Gallery Rome
Via Francesco Crispi 16
00187 Rome
Italy
Tel: (39) 6 42 08 64 98

Events in Mexico

Carlito Dalceggio: I Do Not Scream For An Audience, I Shout At The Holy
MEXICO CITY  •  Celaya Brothers Gallery  •  25 February - 2 April 2016
 
 

For the exhibition I Do Not Scream For An Audience, I Shout At The Holy, Canadian artist, Carlito Dalceggio (born 1971, Quebec) , presents a series of multidisciplinary, spiritual and symbolic artworks. Butterfly wings, kites, peacock feathers, masks, organic motifs that remind us of Mexican popular art with a peculiar reminiscence of Picasso’s cubism, Rauschenberg’s abstract expressionism and Matisse’s primitivism.

In between art school and travels, Dalceggio installed his studio in different cities: Montreal, Mexico City, Bali, New York and Paris, creating a bohemian spirit with local artists, accumulating collaborations in art, fashion, circus arts, photography, literature and film.



Celaya Brothers Gallery Website


Contact: Celaya Brothers Gallery
Mérida 241
C. U. Benito Juárez
06700 Ciudad de México
D.F., Mexico
Tel: (52) 55 6391 5541

Events in Russia

Hannes Meyer, Untitled, c. 1925–1926Linocut on paper, 32.5 × 43.5 cm, gta Archives / ETH Zurich, Hannes Meyer.
Hannes Meyer, Untitled, c. 1925–1926
Linocut on paper, 32.5 × 43.5 cm,
gta Archives / ETH Zurich, Hannes Meyer.
Moving Away: The Internationalist Architect
MOSCOW  •  Garage Museum of Contemporary Art  •  12 September - 30 November 2018
 
 

Moving Away: The Internationalist Architect is part of bauhaus imaginista, a multi-platform, international project that tracks the ideas of the Bauhaus school as transmitted by its designers and architects into diverse cultural and political contexts, including the Soviet Union, Chile, Mexico, India, China, Israel/Palestine, Nigeria, and the United States.

The Moscow iteration of the exhibition traces the complex relationship between the Bauhaus and the Soviet Union through the life and work of former Bauhaus teachers and students in Moscow. It focuses on several graduates and students who were connected to the second Bauhaus director, architect Hannes Meyer, in the Soviet Union in the 1930s: architect Philipp Tolziner, who ended up living the rest of his life in Moscow; architect and urban planner Konrad Püschel; and architect Lotte Stam-Beese, who was the first woman to study in the building department of the Bauhaus Dessau



Garage Museum of Contemporary Art Website


Contact: Garage Museum of Contemporary Art
Krimsky Val, 9 строение 32
Moskva, Russia, 11904
Tel: 7 495 645-05-20

The Fabric of Felicity
MOSCOW  •  Garage Museum of Contemporary Art  •  12 September 2018 - 27 January 2019
 
 

Garage Museum of Contemporary Art presents The Fabric of Felicity, an international project showcasing clothes in art outside the context of the fashion industry. The exhibition spans five continents and features over forty artists, including representatives of historical avant-gardes, members of the Soviet and Brazilian underground art scenes, and new generation artists from Russia, Japan, USA, Zimbabwe, and other countries.

Artists

Narda Alvarado (Bolivia), Taslima Akhter (Bangladesh), Kader Attia (France), Firelei Baez (Dominican Republic/USA), Zarina Bhimji (Uganda/Great Britain), Anastasia Bogomolova (Russia), Huguette Caland (Lebanon/USA), Olga Chernysheva (Russia), Alice Creischer & Andreas Siekmann (Germany), Jimmy De Sana (USA), Sonia Delaunay (France), Hans Ejkelboom (Netherlands), Marie Louise Ekman (Sweden), Hamid El-Kanbouhi (Morocco/Netherlands), Carlos Noronha Feio (Portugal), Alexandra Galkina (Russia), Rimma and Valeriy Gerlovin (Russia/USA), Goldin + Senneby (Sweden), Candida Höfer (Germany), Zhanna Kadyrova (Ukraine), Hayv Kahraman (Iraq/USA), Farrah Karapetian (USA), Shifra Kazhdan & Ksenia Peretrukhina (Russia), Ali Kazma (Turkey), Sharon Kivland (Great Britain), Katalin Ladik (Serbia/Hungary), Lydia Masterkova (Russia), Moataz Nasr (Egypt), Yoko Ono (Japan/USA), Lygia Pape (Brazil), Liubov Popova (Russia), Athi-Patra Ruga (South Africa), Bella Rune (Sweden), Sergey Sapozhnikov (Russia), Beverly Semmes (USA), Kamruzzaman Shadhin (Bangladesh), Vladislav Shapovalov (Russia/Italy), Varvara Stepanova (Russia), Günta Stölzl (Germany), Yuichiro Tamura (Japan), Pedro Valtierra (Mexico), Portia Zvavahera (Zimbabwe), and others.



Garage Museum of Contemporary Art


Contact: Garage Museum of Contemporary Art
9/32 Krymsky Val st., 119049
Moscow, Russia
Tel: 7 495 645-05-20

Events in Spain

Alberto Giacometti: <EM>The Nose (Le Nez),</EM> 1947. Bronze, 80.9 x 70.5 x 40.6 cm. Fondation Giacometti, Paris © Succession Alberto Giacometti ,VEGAP, Bilbao, 2018.
Alberto Giacometti: The Nose (Le Nez), 1947. Bronze, 80.9 x 70.5 x 40.6 cm. Fondation Giacometti, Paris © Succession Alberto Giacometti ,VEGAP, Bilbao, 2018.
Alberto Giacometti: A Retrospective
BILBAO  •  Guggenheim Museum Bilbao  •  19 October 2018 - 24 February 2019
 
The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao presents Alberto Giacometti: A Retrospective , an exhaustive exhibition of more than 200 sculptures, paintings, and drawings by Alberto Giacometti (1901–1966), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, throughout 40 years of his artistic output. The show offers a unique perspective on the artist’s oeuvre, with a particular focus on the extraordinary collection of art and archival materials conserved by the Fondation Giacometti in Paris, which was assembled by the artist’s widow, Annette. Alberto Giacometti.

Guggenheim Bilbao Museo Website


Contact: Guggenheim Bilbao Museo
Avenida Abandoibarra, 2
48009 Bilbao
Spain
Tel: (34) 944 35 90 00

<P>Max Beckmann: <EM>Self-portrait with horn</EM>, 1938 (detail).Oil on canvas, 43 1/4 × 39 1/4 in. (109.9 × 101 cm)Neue Galerie New York and Private collection. </P>

Max Beckmann: Self-portrait with horn, 1938 (detail).
Oil on canvas, 43 1/4 × 39 1/4 in. (109.9 × 101 cm)
Neue Galerie New York and Private collection.

Beckmann: Exile Figures
MADRID  •  Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza  •  25 October 2018 - 27 January 2019
 

The Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza is presenting Beckmann: Exile figures, the first exhibition in Spain in twenty years to be devoted to the artist, one of the most important of the 20th century. While close to New Objectivity at the outset of his career, Max Beckmann (Leipzig, 1884 – New York, 1950) created a unique and independent type of painting, realist in style but filled with symbolic resonances, which came to constitute a vigorous account of society of his day.

Curated by Tomàs Llorens the exhibition features a total of 52 works, principally paintings but also sculptures and lithographs, loaned from museums and collections worldwide and including some of the artist’s most important creations, such as The Boat (1926), Society, Paris (1931), Self-portrait with Horn (1938), City. Night in the City (1950), and The Argonauts (1949-50), the triptych that Beckmann finished on the day he died at a relatively early age in New York.



Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza Website


Contact: Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza
Paseo del Prado, 8 
28014 Madrid, Spain
Tel: (34) 917 911 370

Pablo Picasso:<EM>Woman with Yellow Hair (Femme aux cheveux jaunes),</EM> December 27, 1931Oil and Ripolin (est.) on canvas100 x 81.1 cmSolomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New YorkThannhauser Collection, Gift, Justin K. Thannhauser 78.2514.59© Sucesión Pablo Picasso. VEGAP, Bilbao, 2018Photo: © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York (SRGF)
Pablo Picasso:
Woman with Yellow Hair (Femme aux cheveux jaunes), December 27, 1931
Oil and Ripolin (est.) on canvas
100 x 81.1 cm
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
Thannhauser Collection, Gift, Justin K. Thannhauser 78.2514.59
© Sucesión Pablo Picasso. VEGAP, Bilbao, 2018
Photo: © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York (SRGF)
Van Gogh to Picasso: The Thannhauser Legacy
BILBAO  •  Guggenheim Bilbao Museo  •  21 September 2018 - 24 March 2019
 

 The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao presents Van Gogh to Picasso: The Thannhauser Legacy , featuring the celebrated Thannhauser Collection gifted to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, and marking the first time the majority of the collection as such leaves New York to be exhibited elsewhere. The show includes some fifty works by a number of the most well recognized Impressionists, Post-Impressionists, and modern masters, such as Paul Cézanne, Edgar Degas, Édouard Manet, Pablo Picasso, and Vincent van Gogh. The Thannhauser Collection is a bequest of nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century art given to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation by Justin K. and Hilde Thannhauser. Justin K. Thannhauser was the son of the German Jewish art dealer Heinrich Thannhauser, who founded the Moderne Galerie in Munich in 1909.

After retiring from a distinguished career as a dealer of modern art in Europe and the United States, in 1963 Justin K. Thannhauser (1892–1976) announced a bequest of essential works from his private art collection—spanning some one hundred years—to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation in New York. Hilde Thannhauser (1919–1991), Justin’s widow, subsequently made additional gifts to the institution in 1984 and 1991.



Guggenheim Bilbao Museo Web Site


Contact: Guggenheim Bilbao Museo
Avenida Abandoibarra, 2
48009 Bilbao
Tel: (34) 944 35 90 00

Events in United States

Armenia !
NEW YORK  •  Metropolitan Museum of Art  •  22 September 2018 - 13 January 2019
 

This is the first major U. S. exhibition to explore the remarkable artistic and cultural achievements of the Armenian people in a global context over fourteen centuries—from the fourth century, when the Armenians converted to Christianity in their homeland at the base of Mount Ararat, to the seventeenth century, when Armenian control of global trade routes first brought books printed in Armenian into the region. 

Through some 140 objects—including opulent gilded reliquaries, richly illuminated manuscripts, rare textiles, cross stones (khachkars), precious liturgical furnishings, church models, and printed books—the exhibition demonstrates how Armenians developed a unique Christian identity that linked their widespread communities over the years. 

Representing the cultural heritage of Armenia, most of the works come from major Armenian collections: the Mother See of Holy Etchmiadzin; the Matenadaran (Ancient Manuscripts); the National History Museum in the Republic of Armenia; the Catholicosate of the Great House of Cilicia in Lebanon; the Brotherhood of St. James in Jerusalem; the Mekhitarist Congregation of San Lazzaro degli Armeni in Venice; the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum in Lisbon; the Diocese of the Armenian Church (Eastern) in New York; the Armenian Museum of America in Boston; and the Alex and Marie Manoogian Museum in Michigan.



Metropolitan Museum of Art Website


Contact: Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue
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Tel: (1) 212-535-7710

Art of Native America: The Charles and Valerie Diker Collection
NEW YORK  •  Metropolitan Museum of Art  •  4 October 2018 - 6 October 2019
 
This landmark exhibition in the Museum's American Wing showcases 116 masterworks representing the achievements of artists from more than fifty cultures across North America. Ranging in date from the second to the early twentieth century, the diverse works are promised gifts, donations, and loans to The Met from the pioneering collectors Charles and Valerie Diker. Long considered to be the most significant holdings of historical Native American art in private hands, the Diker Collection has particular strengths in sculpture from British Columbia and Alaska, California baskets, pottery from southwestern pueblos, Plains drawings and regalia, and rare accessories from the eastern Woodlands.

Metropolitan Museum of Art Website


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Berthe Morisot: <EM>Winter,</EM> 1880Oil on canvasDallas Museum of Art, Gift of the Meadows Foundation, Incorporated, 1981.129Photo courtesy Dallas Museum of Art.
Berthe Morisot: Winter, 1880
Oil on canvas
Dallas Museum of Art, Gift of the Meadows Foundation, Incorporated, 1981.129
Photo courtesy Dallas Museum of Art.
Berthe Morisot: Woman Impressionist
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA  •  Barnes Foundation  •  21 October 2018 - 14 January 2019
 
This fall, the Barnes Foundation presents the US debut of a landmark exhibition exploring the significant yet under recognized contributions of Berthe Morisot (1841–1895), one of the founders of impressionism. The first monographic exhibition of the artist to be held in the US since 1987, Berthe Morisot: Woman Impressionist provides new insight into a defining chapter in art history and the opportunity to experience Morisot’s work in context of the Barnes’s unparalleled collection of impressionist, post-impressionist, and early modernist paintings. The internationally touring exhibition is co-organized by the Barnes Foundation, Dallas Museum of Art, Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, and the Musées d’Orsay et de l’Orangerie, Paris. I

Barnes Foundation Website


Contact: Barnes Foundation
2025 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19130
Tel: (1) 215.278.70 00

Bruce Nauman:<EM> Sex and Death by Murder and Suicide</EM>, 1985. Neon tubing mounted on aluminium monolith, 198 x 199 x 32 cm.&nbsp;Emanuel Hoffmann Foundation, on permanent loan to the Öffentliche Kunstsammlung Basel. Photo: Bisig &amp; Bayer, Basel.
Bruce Nauman: Sex and Death by Murder and Suicide, 1985. Neon tubing mounted on aluminium monolith, 198 x 199 x 32 cm. 
Emanuel Hoffmann Foundation, on permanent loan to the Öffentliche Kunstsammlung Basel.
Photo: Bisig & Bayer, Basel.
Bruce Nauman: Disappearing Acts
NEW YORK  •  Museum of Modern Art / MoMA PS1  •  21 October 2018 - 25 February 2019
 

First seen at Schaulager in Basel, Switzerland, this long overdue retrospective exhibition of Bruce Nauman includes video works, drawings, photographs, sculptures, neon pieces, and large-scale installations. In addition to key masterpieces, there are also lesser-known works and, as a world premiere, the 3D video projection Contrapposto Split, the monumental sculpture Leaping Foxes as well as the first ever showing in Europe of his recently created Contrapposto Studies, i through vii.

Born in the American Midwest (Fort Wayne, Indiana) in 1941, Nauman now lives and works in New Mexico. He studied mathematics, music, and physics at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, before changing his major to fine art. In 1966 he graduated with a Master of Fine Arts in sculpture from the University of California, Davis—where he had studied with William Wiley, among others.

His groundbreaking oeuvre has made him a central figure in contemporary art, exploring themes such as language and physicality while at the same time plumbing the depths of power structures and regulatory frameworks. By insistently calling into question our aesthetic and moral values, as well as our habitual ways of seeing, Bruce Nauman challenges our perceptions and imaginings in ever new ways.

Disappearing Acts traces strategies of withdrawal in Nauman’s work—both literal and figurative incidents of removal, deflection, and concealment. With a keen eye, he investigates the experience of one’s own body and its relation to space. His works often have the character of simple laboratory tests or critical self-interrogations.



Museum of Modern Art Website


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Museum of Modern Art
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Tel: (212) 708-9400

<P>Charles White (American, 1918-1979), Gideon, 1951. Lithograph in black on ivory wove paper, printed by Robert Blackburn (American, 1920–2003)© The Charles White Archives Inc.</P> • <P>&nbsp;</P>

Charles White (American, 1918-1979), Gideon, 1951. Lithograph in black on ivory wove paper, printed by Robert Blackburn (American, 1920–2003)
© The Charles White Archives Inc.

 

Charles White: A Retrospective
NEW YORK  •  The Museum of Modern Art  •  7 October 2018 - 13 January 2019
 
“Art must be an integral part of the struggle,” Charles White (American, 1918-1979), insisted. “It can’t simply mirror what’s taking place. … It must ally itself with the forces of liberation.” Over the course of his four-decade career, White’s commitment to creating powerful images of African Americans—what his gallerist and, later, White himself described as “images of dignity”—was unwavering. Using his virtuoso skills as a draftsman, printmaker, and painter, White developed his style and approach over time to address shifting concerns and new audiences. In each of the cities in which he lived over the course of his career—Chicago, New York, and, finally, Los Angeles—White became a key figure within a vibrant community of creative artists, writers, and activists.

White’s far-reaching vision of a socially committed practice attracted promising young artists, including many artists of color, and he became one of the 20th century’s most important and dedicated teachers. Acclaimed contemporary artists David Hammons and Kerry James Marshall were among his many students: as Marshall reflected, “Under Charles White’s influence I always knew that I wanted to make work that was about something: history, culture, politics, social issues. … It was just a matter of mastering the skills to actually do it.”

Charles White: A Retrospective is the first major museum survey devoted to the artist in over 30 years. The exhibition charts White’s full career—from the 1930s through his premature death in 1979—with over 100 works, including drawings, paintings, prints, photographs, illustrated books, record covers and archival materials.



The Museum of Modern Art Website


Contact: The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York, NY 10019
Tel: 1 (212) 708-9400

Eugène Delacroix:<EM> Le 28 Juillet : La Liberté guidant le peuple</EM>, musée du Louvre
Eugène Delacroix: Le 28 Juillet : La Liberté guidant le peuple, musée du Louvre
Delacroix
NEW YORK  •  Metropolitan Museum of Art  •  17 September 2018 - 6 January 2019
 

Eugène Delacroix was one of the giants of French painting, but his last full retrospective exhibition in Paris dates back to 1963, the centenary year of his death. In collaboration with the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Louvre is holding a historic exhibition featuring some 180 works—mostly paintings—as a tribute to his entire career.

From the young artist’s big hits at the Salons of the 1820s to his final, lesser-known, and mysterious religious paintings and landscapes, the exhibition seeks to showcase the tension that characterizes the art of Delacroix, who strove for individuality while aspiring to follow in the footsteps of the Flemish and Venetian masters of the 16th and 17th centuries.

The exhibition illuminates Delacroix's restless imagination through paintings, drawings, prints, and manuscripts—many never before seen in the United States. It unfolds chronologically, encompassing the rich variety of themes that preoccupied the artist during his more than four decades of activity, including literature, history, religion, animals, and nature. Through rarely seen graphic art displayed alongside such iconic paintings as Greece on the Ruins of Missolonghi (1826), The Battle of Nancy (1831), Women of Algiers in Their Apartment (1834), and Medea about to Kill Her Children (1838), this exhibition explores an artist whose protean genius set the bar for virtually all other French painters.



Metropolitan Museum of Art Website


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<P>Tintoretto (1518-1594), <EM>Study of a seated nude,</EM> ca. 1549, black and white chalk on blue paper. Louvre 5385© RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, N.</P>

Tintoretto (1518-1594), Study of a seated nude, ca. 1549, black and white chalk on blue paper. Louvre 5385
© RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, N.

Drawing in Tintoretto’s Venice
NEW YORK  •  The Morgan Library & Museum  •  12 October 2018 - 6 January 2019
 

Jacopo Tintoretto (1518–1594) was among the most distinctive artists of the Italian Renaissance, but his drawings have never received the attention they deserve and remain unfamiliar even to many scholars. Drawing in Tintoretto’s Venice is the first exhibition since 1956 to explore the drawing practice of this major figure of the Venetian Renaissance and offers an entirely new perspective on Tintoretto’s evolution as a draftsman, his individuality as an artist, and his influence on a generation of painters in northern Italy. An introductory section of the exhibition showcases works by Titian, Veronese, Bassano, and other contemporaries as a way to understand both Tintoretto’s sources as well as his originality. The heart of the show, featuring Tintoretto’s distinctive figure drawings—both preparatory drawings and a group of studies after sculptures by Michelangelo and others—examines the use of drawings within the studio as well as teaching practices in the workshop. A following section focuses on artists—Domenico Tintoretto, Palma Giovane, and others working in Venice during the late sixteenth century—whose drawing style was influenced by Tintoretto’s, while in a final section, visitors will be able to consider an interesting group of drawings, previously attributed to Tintoretto or to Palma Giovane, which have recently been proposed as the work of the young El Greco during his time in Italy.

The exhibition brings together more than seventy drawings and a small group of related paintings from nearly two dozen public and private collections in Europe and the United States, including the Morgan Library & Museum, the National Gallery of Art (NGA), the Uffizi, the Louvre, and the British Museum, among others. Organized to mark the five-hundredth anniversary of the artist’s birth, this presentation coincides in New York with the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s exhibition of Tintoretto portraits.

When it travels to the NGA in March 2019, it will join a major retrospective of his paintings



The Morgan Library & Museum Website


Contact: The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10016
Tel: (1) (212) 685-0008

Glenn Ligon: What We Said The Last Time
NEW YORK  •  Luhring Augustine  •  27 February - 2 April 2016
 

Luhring Augustine presents What We Said The Last Time, an exhibition of new work by Glenn Ligon, and Entanglements, a curatorial project by the artist. A companion exhibition entitled We Need To Wake Up Cause That’s What Time It Is opened at Luhring Augustine Bushwick on January 16th and remains on view through 17 April 2016. 

What We Said The Last Time features a suite of seventeen inkjet prints that document the paint-spattered pages of the artist’s well-worn copy of James Baldwin’s seminal 1953 essay “Stranger in the Village.” Written during a stay in a remote Swiss mountain hamlet, Baldwin’s text examines complex and urgent questions around blackness, culture, and history. Since 1996, Ligon has used the essay as the basis of his “Stranger” series, including prints, drawings, and dense paintings made with oil stick and often coal dust that oscillate between legibility and obscurity. While creating these canvases, Ligon kept pages of Baldwin’s essay on his studio table for reference, and over the years they became covered with random smudges of black paint, oil stains, and fingerprints. Intrigued by this accumulation of marks, Ligon transformed the book pages into a suite of large-scale prints, using the full text of the essay for the first time in his career. The resulting work is a palimpsest of accumulated personal histories that suggests Ligon’s long engagement with Baldwin’s essay, as well as a new strategy in his ongoing exploration of the interplay between language and abstraction.

Also on view is Entanglements, a curatorial project by Ligon that examines how artists use the studio as a base from which to engage momentous cultural shifts and political events in both direct and oblique ways.  Key to the exhibition is Bruce Nauman’s Violin Tuned D.E.A.D. (1968), a video that presents the artist repetitively playing a single note on a violin with his back to the camera. While discussions of Nauman’s video works from this period have focused on issues of performativity, endurance, and the body, Ligon was interested in how Nauman’s discordant note can be heard as a soundtrack to the war in Vietnam or the brutal violence faced by civil rights workers. While not directly commenting on these issues, the ominous soundscape of Violin Tuned D.E.A.D. nevertheless suggests Nauman’s engagement with that turbulent moment in American history and served as a point of departure for Ligon to consider other works in which the artist’s studio has acted as a conduit for contemporary events. Ligon’s selections posit new identities, conversations or modes of sociability as a response to pressing social and political issues.  Entanglements features artworks and ephemera by Felix Gonzalez-Torres, David Hammons, On Kawara, Glenn Ligon, Bruce Nauman, Adrian Piper, Bob Thompson, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, and Andy Warhol. 

Glenn Ligon lives and works in New York.



Luhring Augustine Website


Contact: Luhring Augustine
531 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011
Tel: (1) 212 206 91 00

Lola Álvarez Bravo, Untitled, 1954.Gelatin silver print. Center for Creative PhotographyUniversity of Arizona: Lola Álvarez Bravo Archive 93.6.70 © 1995 Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona Foundation.
Lola Álvarez Bravo, Untitled, 1954.
Gelatin silver print. Center for Creative Photography
University of Arizona: Lola Álvarez Bravo Archive 93.6.70
© 1995 Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona Foundation.
Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico
ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI  •  Pulitzer Arts Foundation  •  14 September 2018 - 16 February 2019
 
The Pulitzer Arts Foundation explores the career of pioneering Mexican photographer Lola Álvarez Bravo (1903 – 1993) with an exhibition of images that she considered to be her personal photography. Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico presents nearly 50 photographs and photomontages spanning Álvarez Bravo’s fivedecade career. Together, these illuminate the ways in which her modernist aesthetic, with meticulous attention to pattern, light, and composition, contributed to her depictions of Mexico’s diverse inhabitants and landscapes as she traveled the country documenting life in the years following the Mexican Revolution (ca. 1910– 1920).

Pulitzer Arts Foundation Website


Contact: Pulitzer Arts Foundation
3716 Washington Boulevard
St. Louis, MO 63108
Tel: (1) 314 754 18 50

<P>Kawanabe Ky&#333;sai: <EM>Hell Courtesan</EM>, 1885/89Weston Collection</P>

Kawanabe Kyōsai: Hell Courtesan, 1885/89
Weston Collection

Painting the Floating World: Ukiyo-e Masterpieces from the Weston Collection
CHICAGO  •  Art Institute of Chicago  •  4 November 2018 - 27 January 2019
 

In the 17th century, Kyoto, Osaka, and Edo (now Tokyo) were Japan’s thriving cities, complete with bustling entertainment districts where ukiyo, or the “floating world,” was born. People of all ranks shared in the enjoyment of the floating world’s attractions—brothels, kabuki theater, and seasonal festivities. Artists of the period captured this popular phenomena in ukiyo-e, or “pictures of the floating world.” Over the last 25 years, Roger Weston has assembled an outstanding collection of ukiyo-e paintings—masterpieces by the most famed artists of the day. This exhibition, the first public showing of his comprehensive ukiyo-e painting collection in the United States, showcases the sheer beauty of floating world painting and offers an exclusive view of the urban amusements of early modern Japan.

In contrast to ukiyo-e woodblock prints, which were created in multiples and consequently well circulated, ukiyo-e paintings were one-of-a-kind works commissioned from the same artists celebrated for their prints, including Katsushika Hokusai and Kitagawa Utamaro. Lavish and unique objects, the paintings were conceived in various forms—folding screens, hanging scrolls, handscrolls, and albums—and emphasize the makers’ talent and technical skill. Until recently, these compelling works were not often collected in large numbers outside of Japan, making the quality and range of the Weston Collection all the more extraordinary.



Art Institute of Chicago Website


Contact: Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60603
Tel: (312) 443-3600

Titian (Tiziano Vecellio): Venus Rising from the Sea, 1520, Oil on canvas (29 13/16 x 22 11/16 in.) National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh.
Titian (Tiziano Vecellio): Venus Rising from the Sea, 1520, Oil on canvas (29 13/16 x 22 11/16 in.) National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh.
The Renaissance Nude
LOS ANGELES  •  J. Paul Getty Museum  •  30 October 2018 - 27 January 2019
 
Drawing inspiration from classical sculpture and the study of the live model, Renaissance artists made the nude central to their art, creating lifelike, vibrant, and varied representations of the human body. This transformative moment is one that would shape the course of European art history and resonate through the present day. On view at the J. Paul Getty Museum October 30, 2018 through January 27, 2019, The Renaissance Nude traces the rise of the nude over the course of a century with masterpieces made in Italy, France, Germany, and the Netherlands, from the early 15th to the early 16th century.

J. Paul Getty Museum Website


Contact: J. Paul Getty Museum
1200 Getty Center Dr
Los Angeles, CA 90049

Tel: (1) (310) 440-7300

<EM>Ntozakhe II,</EM> Parktown, 2016.© Zanele Muholi.Courtesy of Stevenson, Cape Town/Johannesburgand Yancey Richardson, New York
Ntozakhe II, Parktown, 2016.
© Zanele Muholi.
Courtesy of Stevenson, Cape Town/Johannesburg
and Yancey Richardson, New York
Zanele Muholi: Somnyama Ngonyama, Hail The Dark Lioness
ATLANTA, GEORGIA  •  Spelman College Museum of Fine Art  •  14 September - 8 December 2018
 

Spelman College Museum of Fine Art is presenting the United States premiere of Zanele Muholi: Somnyama Ngonyama, Hail The Dark Lioness, an internationally touring exhibition organized by Autograph, London and curated by Renée Mussai. In more than 70 photographs, visual activist Zanele Muholi (South African, b. 1972), whose pronouns are they, them, and their, uses their body as a canvas to confront the politics of race and representation in the visual archive. In Somnyama Ngonyama, which translates to Hail The Dark Lioness in isiZulu, one of the official languages of South Africa, Muholi playfully employs the conventions of classical painting, fashion photography, and the familiar tropes of ethnographic imagery to rearticulate contemporary identity politics.



Spelman College Museum of Fine Art Website


Contact: Spelman College Museum of Fine Art
350 Spelman Lane, S.W.
Atlanta, GA 30314-4399
Tel: (1) 404-681-3643

Jewelry: The Body Transformed
NEW YORK  •  Metropolitan Museum of Art  •  12 November 2018 - 24 February 2019
 
What is jewelry? Why do we wear it? What meanings does it carry? Traversing time and space, this exhibition explores how jewelry acts upon and activates the body it adorns. This global conversation about one of the most personal and universal of art forms brings together some 230 objects drawn almost exclusively from The Met collection. A dazzling array of headdresses and ear ornaments, brooches and belts, necklaces and rings will be shown along with sculptures, paintings, prints, and photographs that will enrich and amplify the many stories of transformation that jewelry tells.

Metropolitan Museum of Art Website


Contact: Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10028


Tel: (1) 212-535-7710

Sally Mann: A Selection
BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA  •  Gagosian  •  15 November - 15 December 2018
 

To coincide with Sally Mann’s survey exhibition, A Thousand Crossings, at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, Gagosian presents a selection of Mann’s photographs.

For more than four decades Mann’s haunting photography of the people and landscapes around her has explored memory, desire, death, the bonds of family, and human connections to nature and place. The works on view are drawn from three series: Deep South and Battlefields, which depict “the radical light of the American South” with an oblique and lyric universality, and Proud Flesh, an intimate portrait of Mann’s husband.

Mann began taking the photographs that would become the Deep South series in 1998, when she drove through the Deep South to Louisiana. Working with a large-format camera and the nineteenth-century wet-plate collodion process, Mann constructed a makeshift darkroom in the back of her car, shooting and printing the images as she went. Making negatives this way gives rise to serendipitous and evocative imperfections—streaks, scratches, spots, and pits. The resulting silver gelatin prints, such as Untitled (Emmett Till River Bank) (1998), are both completely in and of their environment: eerily quiet roads, ruins, and riverbanks that were the sites of both ordinary life and unspeakable violence.



Gagosian Gallery Website


Contact: 456 North Camden Drive
Beverly Hills, CA 90210
Tel: (1) 310 271 9400

Amar Kanwar: Such a Morning
NEW YORK  •  Marian Goodman Gallery  •  14 November - 21 December 2018
 
 

Marian Goodman Gallery New York presents Amar Kanwar’s Such a Morning (2017), following its original premiere at Documenta 14 in Athens and Kassel.

The 85-minute single-channel film installation Such a Morning is a modern parable about two people’s quiet engagement with truth through phantom visions from within the depths of darkness. Searching for a way to re-comprehend the difficult times we are living in, Kanwar asks “What is it that lies beyond, when all arguments are done with? How to reconfigure and respond again?”

Such a Morning unlocks a metaphysical response to our contemporary reality as it navigates multiple hallucinations between speech and silence, fear and freedom, democracy and fascism. In the feature-length film, a famous mathematician at the peak of his career unexpectedly withdraws from his life and retreats to the wilderness to live in an abandoned train carriage. Creating a zone of darkness so as to acclimatize himself before total darkness descends, the professor begins to live in a realm bereft of light. Thus starts an epic sensory journey into a new plane of emotional resonance between the self and the surrounding world. A parallel story emerges within the course of the film, providing a compelling, analogous narrative to the protagonist’s. Over time, the professor records his epiphanies and hallucinations in an almanac of the dark, an examination of 49 types of darkness that emerge as a series of letters.

Based originally on Kanwar’s research into the diversity of existing narrative structures in the Indian subcontinent, Such a Morning reaches beyond place to expose the complexity of a fractious moment in history in which every truth seems to have an opposite brutal truth



Marian Goodman Gallery Website


Contact: Marian Goodman Gallery
24 West 57th Street, 4th Floor
New York, New York 10019

Karl Wirsum: Screamin’ Jay Hawkins, 1968The Art Institute of ChicagoMr. and Mrs. Frank G. Logan Purchase Prize Fund, 1969.248
Karl Wirsum: Screamin' Jay Hawkins, 1968
The Art Institute of Chicago
Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Logan Purchase Prize Fund, 1969.248
Hairy Who? 1966–1969
CHICAGO  •  Art Institute of Chicago  •  26 September 2018 - 6 January 2019
 
 

The Art Institute of Chicago presents the first major exhibition dedicated solely to the groundbreaking Hairy Who. This self-named, self-organized group of six artists—Jim Falconer, Art Green, Gladys Nilsson, Jim Nutt, Suellen Rocca, and Karl Wirsum—all came of age in Chicago, graduated from the School of the Art Institute, and began exhibiting at the Hyde Park Art Center in the late 1960s. In 1966–68, they organized a series of three exhibitions there with input and assistance from then-director Don Baum. In 1968–69, three subsequent shows were mounted across the United States—one at the San Francisco Art Institute, organized by Phil Linhares; one at the School of Visual Arts, New York, organized by Shirley Glaser; and one at the Corcoran Gallery at DuPont Center, Washington, DC, organized by Walter Hopps.

These gonzo displays of bright, bold, graphic work—made with unconventional media on novel supports—were full of personal symbolism which challenged prevailing notions of gender, sexuality, standards of beauty, and social mores. Transforming the landscape of art in Chicago, The Hairy Who’s distinct aesthetic brought the city immense national attention.

Presented on the 50th anniversary of their final Chicago show, The Art Institute’s major survey exhibition and publication feature key works as well as archival ephemera contextualizing the group’s creative process, working methods, and the social and political milieu in which they made their art.



Art Institute of Chicago Website


Contact:

Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60603


Tel: (312) 443-3600



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