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Events in Australia

Gods, Myths and Mortals: Greek Treasures Across the Millennia from the Benaki Museum
MELBOURNE  •  Hellenic Museum of Melbourne  •  10 September 2014 - 10 October 2019
 

The exhibition: Gods, Myths and Mortals: Greek Treasures Across the Millennia from the Benaki Museum, offers a manageable, yet complete, picture of the span of Greek civilisation. 

It highlights the unbroken continuation and unity of Hellenism, from earliest prehistory to the Classical and Hellenistic years, from the Roman era to the end of the Byzantine period, and from the centuries of foreign rule up to the revolutionary revival of 1821, and the founding of the Modern Greek state. The captivating progression of Greek art, and the twists and turns of Greece’s history are narrated by representative objects from almost eight millennia, coming as much from Greece itself as from lands where Greek culture took hold. At this crossroads between Europe, Africa and Asia, man – despite long periods of unrest and insecurity – managed to maintain the essential components of his civilisation: an anthropocentric view of the world, lively and inspirational thinking and the fruitful assimilation of as many influences as were accepted from its conquerors over time. 

In the exhibition of the Benaki Museum, aspects of everyday life and different sides of religious expression are presented together with documents about the social and political organisation, in order to record the narrative that can be read within the development of Greek civilisation. 



Hellenic Museum of Melbourne Website


Contact:

Hellenic Museum of Melbourne
280 William Street
Melbourne VIC 3000
Australia


Tel: 61 3 8615 9016

Events in Italy

Prototypology: An Index of Process and Mutation
ROME  •  Gagosian Gallery Rome  •  14 January - 2 April 2016
 
 

Prototypology explores research and development in the work of thirty contemporary artists, tracing the evolution from idea to finished artwork through drawings, archives, maquettes, and bricolage. In doing so the exhibition establishes a typology of diverse drafts.

The studio is a liminal zone for sourcing, modifying, and testing. Derived from the Italian word schizzare (splash), a "sketch" represents the initial impulse from mind to hand, the developmental process whereby form begins to emerge. In the laboratory of the studio, bricolage is often used as an instinctual method in the construction of prototypes.

The exhibition includes new works and archival material from Michael Heizer, Takashi Murakami, Albert Oehlen, and Robert Therrien, among other artists. Studies for sculptures by Dan Graham, Claes Oldenburg, Tatiana Trouvé, and Rachel Whiteread reveal moments of process that lead to epiphanies. Monumental, civic, everyday, and otherworldly gestures are visible in a range of preparatory drawings and proposals.

Artists: Vladimir Arkhipov, Richard Artschwager, Nina Beier, Will Boone, Mike Bouchet, Chris Burden, Jason Dodge, Aleksandra Domanović, Dan Graham, Loris Gréaud, Michael Heizer, Carsten Höller, Thomas Houseago, Allan McCollum, Takashi Murakami, Albert Oehlen, Claes Oldenburg, Steven Parrino, Giuseppe Penone, Kirsten Pieroth, Ry Rocklen, Nancy Rubins, Arcangelo Sassolino, David Smith, Rudolf Stingel, Robert Therrien, Mungo Thomson, Tatiana Trouvé, Cy Twombly, Rachel Whiteread



Gagosian Gallery Rome Website


Contact: Gagosian Gallery Rome
Via Francesco Crispi 16
00187 Rome
Italy
Tel: (39) 6 42 08 64 98

Events in Mexico

Carlito Dalceggio: I Do Not Scream For An Audience, I Shout At The Holy
MEXICO CITY  •  Celaya Brothers Gallery  •  25 February - 2 April 2016
 
 

For the exhibition I Do Not Scream For An Audience, I Shout At The Holy, Canadian artist, Carlito Dalceggio (born 1971, Quebec) , presents a series of multidisciplinary, spiritual and symbolic artworks. Butterfly wings, kites, peacock feathers, masks, organic motifs that remind us of Mexican popular art with a peculiar reminiscence of Picasso’s cubism, Rauschenberg’s abstract expressionism and Matisse’s primitivism.

In between art school and travels, Dalceggio installed his studio in different cities: Montreal, Mexico City, Bali, New York and Paris, creating a bohemian spirit with local artists, accumulating collaborations in art, fashion, circus arts, photography, literature and film.



Celaya Brothers Gallery Website


Contact: Celaya Brothers Gallery
Mérida 241
C. U. Benito Juárez
06700 Ciudad de México
D.F., Mexico
Tel: (52) 55 6391 5541

Events in United States

Art of Native America: The Charles and Valerie Diker Collection
NEW YORK  •  Metropolitan Museum of Art  •  4 October 2018 - 6 October 2019
 
This landmark exhibition in the Museum's American Wing showcases 116 masterworks representing the achievements of artists from more than fifty cultures across North America. Ranging in date from the second to the early twentieth century, the diverse works are promised gifts, donations, and loans to The Met from the pioneering collectors Charles and Valerie Diker. Long considered to be the most significant holdings of historical Native American art in private hands, the Diker Collection has particular strengths in sculpture from British Columbia and Alaska, California baskets, pottery from southwestern pueblos, Plains drawings and regalia, and rare accessories from the eastern Woodlands.

Metropolitan Museum of Art Website


Contact:

Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10028


Tel: (1) 212-535-7710

Glenn Ligon: What We Said The Last Time
NEW YORK  •  Luhring Augustine  •  27 February - 2 April 2016
 

Luhring Augustine presents What We Said The Last Time, an exhibition of new work by Glenn Ligon, and Entanglements, a curatorial project by the artist. A companion exhibition entitled We Need To Wake Up Cause That’s What Time It Is opened at Luhring Augustine Bushwick on January 16th and remains on view through 17 April 2016. 

What We Said The Last Time features a suite of seventeen inkjet prints that document the paint-spattered pages of the artist’s well-worn copy of James Baldwin’s seminal 1953 essay “Stranger in the Village.” Written during a stay in a remote Swiss mountain hamlet, Baldwin’s text examines complex and urgent questions around blackness, culture, and history. Since 1996, Ligon has used the essay as the basis of his “Stranger” series, including prints, drawings, and dense paintings made with oil stick and often coal dust that oscillate between legibility and obscurity. While creating these canvases, Ligon kept pages of Baldwin’s essay on his studio table for reference, and over the years they became covered with random smudges of black paint, oil stains, and fingerprints. Intrigued by this accumulation of marks, Ligon transformed the book pages into a suite of large-scale prints, using the full text of the essay for the first time in his career. The resulting work is a palimpsest of accumulated personal histories that suggests Ligon’s long engagement with Baldwin’s essay, as well as a new strategy in his ongoing exploration of the interplay between language and abstraction.

Also on view is Entanglements, a curatorial project by Ligon that examines how artists use the studio as a base from which to engage momentous cultural shifts and political events in both direct and oblique ways.  Key to the exhibition is Bruce Nauman’s Violin Tuned D.E.A.D. (1968), a video that presents the artist repetitively playing a single note on a violin with his back to the camera. While discussions of Nauman’s video works from this period have focused on issues of performativity, endurance, and the body, Ligon was interested in how Nauman’s discordant note can be heard as a soundtrack to the war in Vietnam or the brutal violence faced by civil rights workers. While not directly commenting on these issues, the ominous soundscape of Violin Tuned D.E.A.D. nevertheless suggests Nauman’s engagement with that turbulent moment in American history and served as a point of departure for Ligon to consider other works in which the artist’s studio has acted as a conduit for contemporary events. Ligon’s selections posit new identities, conversations or modes of sociability as a response to pressing social and political issues.  Entanglements features artworks and ephemera by Felix Gonzalez-Torres, David Hammons, On Kawara, Glenn Ligon, Bruce Nauman, Adrian Piper, Bob Thompson, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, and Andy Warhol. 

Glenn Ligon lives and works in New York.



Luhring Augustine Website


Contact: Luhring Augustine
531 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011
Tel: (1) 212 206 91 00

The New Greek Galleries: Greek and Roman Art Galleries
NEW YORK  •  Metropolitan Museum of Art  •  20 April 1999 - 1 January 2019
 
Following several years of planning and construction, seven completely renovated and reinstalled galleries for Greek art are open to the public on the Museum's first floor. This latest stage in a three-phase expansion of the exhibition space devoted to Greek and Roman art comprises the Mary and Michael Jaharis Gallery—the grand vaulted gallery that was formerly known as the Cypriot corridor, now fully skylit from above and clad in limestone walls as originally envisioned by McKim, Mead and White in 1917—and the six flanking galleries for Archaic and Classical Greek art, restored.

Metropolitan Museum of Art Web Site


Contact: Tel: (1) 212 535 77 10



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