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Calendar: Israel

Events in Art and Archaeology

Canaanite amulet of a schematic nude goddess in Egyptian styleTell el-Ajjul, 15th century BCE, goldCollection of Israel Antiquities AuthorityPhoto © The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, by Elie Posner
Canaanite amulet of a schematic nude goddess in Egyptian style
Tell el-Ajjul, 15th century BCE, gold
Collection of Israel Antiquities Authority
Photo © The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, by Elie Posner
Pharaoh in Canaan: The Untold Story
JERUSALEM, ISRAEL  •  The Israel Museum  •  4 March 2016 - 25 October 2015
 
A major exhibition at the Israel Museum provides audiences with an unprecedented opportunity to explore the cross-cultural ties between Egypt and Canaan during the second millennium BCE.  Pharaoh in Canaan: The Untold Story presents more than 680 objects that reflect the cross-fertilization of ritual practices and aesthetic vocabularies between these two distinct ancient cultures. From large-scale royal victory stelae and anthropoid coffins to scarabs and amulets, the display features an array of archaeological artifacts discovered in Israel and Egypt—including many drawn from the Museum’s own collections, together with major loans from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, N.Y.; the Louvre Museum, Paris; the Kunsthistorisches Museum; Vienna; the Egyptian Museum in Turin, Italy; and numerous other collections.

“This exhibition explores a crucial, yet forgotten chapter in the history of ancient civilizations. Pharaoh in Canaan tells the revelatory story of the cross-cultural dynamics between Canaan and Egypt and the resulting and often astonishing aesthetic, ritual, and cultural affinities that developed between these two distinct peoples,” said James S. Snyder, the Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. “It is especially appropriate that the Israel Museum tell this remarkable archaeological story from its setting in Jerusalem and with its rich collections that trace the ancient roots of the region around us.”

The story of Egypt and Canaan is most commonly known from the biblical narratives of Joseph and Moses in Egypt. The exhibition expands this story by examining two crucial periods in history: the settlement and rise of a Canaanite dynasty in the eastern Egyptian Delta during the Middle Bronze Age (circa 1700-1550 BCE); and the extended period of Egyptian rule over Canaan by the Pharaohs during the Late Bronze Age (circa 1500-1150 BCE), both of which led to the commingling of deities, arts, rituals, and technologies between the two cultures.

The exhibition features a variety of Egyptian and Egyptian-inspired objects from Canaanite sites as well as illustrative objects from Egypt, ranging from large-scale architectural reconstructions to small-scale personal effects.

Exhibition highlights include:

· Egyptian Scarabs: Bearing divine and royal names and images, these objects were found in Canaanite tombs, reflecting the adaptation of Egyptian burial customs by the local Canaanite elite.

· Egyptian Private Stelae: Made locally by Egyptians stationed at the Canaanite site of Beth Shean, these stelae depict Egyptians worshipping Canaanite gods, among them the goddess Anat, who was also worshipped in Egypt at that same time, and the god Mekal, a local god of Beth Shean.

· Fragment of a Monumental Sphinx of Mycerinus: The only Old Kingdom royal statue found in the Levantine region, this fragment was likely an official gift either to a local ruler or to the temple at Hazor when it was a site of great power during the Late Bronze Age.

· Tutankhamun Inscribed Solid Gold Ring: The only object excavated in Israel bearing the name of this king, the ring was found in an elaborate tomb in Tell el-`Ajjul together with other Egyptian and Egyptian-style jewelry that reflects the local emulation of Egyptian aesthetic traditions.

· Statue of Ramesses III: Placed in a temple at Beth Shean—one of the most important Egyptian strongholds in Canaan during the time of the empire—this is the only evidence of a locally made royal statue in Canaan—and a stunning example of Egyptian cultic activity in Canaanite temples.

· Royal Stelae: Two stelae of Seti I erected at Beth Shean commemorate victorious military campaigns of the king to suppress local rebellions and reinforce Egyptian control over Canaan.

· Anthropoid Coffins: Locally made Egyptian-style clay coffins, found mainly at Egyptian sites in Canaan, served both Egyptians stationed at these bases as well as Canaanites working in their service.

The Israel Museum Website


Contact: The Israel Museum
11 Ruppin Boulevard
Hakyria
Jerusalem
Israel
Tel: (972) 2 670 88 11

<DIV style="LEFT: -99999px; POSITION: absolute">Bronze portraits of the Emperor Hadrian, from the British Museum (left); the Israel Museum (center);and the Louvre (right) [Credit: Elie Posner, Israel Museum, Jerusalem]Read more at: <A href="http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2015/12/hadrian-emperor-cast-in-bronze-at.html#.Vp1Zzk-LFqA">http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2015/12/hadrian-emperor-cast-in-bronze-at.html#.Vp1Zzk-LFqA</A>Follow us: @ArchaeoNewsNet on Twitter | groups/thearchaeologynewsnetwork/ on Facebook </DIV> • <DIV style="LEFT: -99999px; POSITION: absolute">Bronze portraits of the Emperor Hadrian, from the British Museum (left); the Israel Museum (center);and the Louvre (right) [Credit: Elie Posner, Israel Museum, Jerusalem]Read more at: <A href="http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2015/12/hadrian-emperor-cast-in-bronze-at.html#.Vp1Zzk-LFqA">http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2015/12/hadrian-emperor-cast-in-bronze-at.html#.Vp1Zzk-LFqA</A>Follow us: @ArchaeoNewsNet on Twitter | groups/thearchaeologynewsnetwork/ on Facebook </DIV> • <DIV style="LEFT: -99999px; POSITION: absolute">Bronze portraits of the Emperor Hadrian, from the British Museum (left); the Israel Museum (center);and the Louvre (right) [Credit: Elie Posner, Israel Museum, Jerusalem]Read more at: <A href="http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2015/12/hadrian-emperor-cast-in-bronze-at.html#.Vp1Zzk-LFqA">http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2015/12/hadrian-emperor-cast-in-bronze-at.html#.Vp1Zzk-LFqA</A>Follow us: @ArchaeoNewsNet on Twitter | groups/thearchaeologynewsnetwork/ on Facebook </DIV> • <DIV style="LEFT: -99999px; POSITION: absolute">Bronze portraits of the Emperor Hadrian, from the British Museum (left); the Israel Museum (center);and the Louvre (right) [Credit: Elie Posner, Israel Museum, Jerusalem]Read more at: <A href="http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2015/12/hadrian-emperor-cast-in-bronze-at.html#.Vp1Zzk-LFqA">http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2015/12/hadrian-emperor-cast-in-bronze-at.html#.Vp1Zzk-LFqA</A>Follow us: @ArchaeoNewsNet on Twitter | groups/thearchaeologynewsnetwork/ on Facebook </DIV><SPAN class=pie_g style="DISPLAY: block; MARGIN: 0px auto; TEXT-ALIGN: left" align="top">Bronze portraits of the Emperor Hadrian, from the British Museum (left); the Israel Museum (center);and the Louvre (right) Photo:©Elie Posner, Israel Museum, Jerusalem</SPAN>
Bronze portraits of the Emperor Hadrian, from the British Museum (left); the Israel Museum (center);and the Louvre (right) [Credit: Elie Posner, Israel Museum, Jerusalem]

Read more at: http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2015/12/hadrian-emperor-cast-in-bronze-at.html#.Vp1Zzk-LFqA
Follow us: @ArchaeoNewsNet on Twitter | groups/thearchaeologynewsnetwork/ on Facebook
Bronze portraits of the Emperor Hadrian, from the British Museum (left); the Israel Museum (center);and the Louvre (right) [Credit: Elie Posner, Israel Museum, Jerusalem]

Read more at: http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2015/12/hadrian-emperor-cast-in-bronze-at.html#.Vp1Zzk-LFqA
Follow us: @ArchaeoNewsNet on Twitter | groups/thearchaeologynewsnetwork/ on Facebook
Bronze portraits of the Emperor Hadrian, from the British Museum (left); the Israel Museum (center);and the Louvre (right) [Credit: Elie Posner, Israel Museum, Jerusalem]

Read more at: http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2015/12/hadrian-emperor-cast-in-bronze-at.html#.Vp1Zzk-LFqA
Follow us: @ArchaeoNewsNet on Twitter | groups/thearchaeologynewsnetwork/ on Facebook
Bronze portraits of the Emperor Hadrian, from the British Museum (left); the Israel Museum (center);and the Louvre (right) [Credit: Elie Posner, Israel Museum, Jerusalem]

Read more at: http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2015/12/hadrian-emperor-cast-in-bronze-at.html#.Vp1Zzk-LFqA
Follow us: @ArchaeoNewsNet on Twitter | groups/thearchaeologynewsnetwork/ on Facebook
Bronze portraits of the Emperor Hadrian, from the British Museum (left); the Israel Museum (center);and the Louvre (right)
Photo:©Elie Posner, Israel Museum, Jerusalem
Hadrian: An Emperor Cast in Bronze
JERUSALEM, ISRAEL  •  The Israel Museum  •  22 December 2015 - 30 June 2016
 
Three extant bronze portraits of Publius Aelius Hadrianus—better known as the Emperor Hadrian (117 – 138 CE), one of the boldest and most accomplished rulers of the Roman Empire—are brought together for a first-time display in the Israel Museum’s Archaeology Wing, marking a symbolic return of the Emperor to Jerusalem, whose last visit to the city was in 130 CE.  Hadrian: An Emperor Cast in Bronze, concludes the Israel Museum’s celebrations of its 50th anniversary throughout 2015, and is among a series of special displays spotlighting masterworks from sister institutions loaned in tribute to the Museum and presented in dialogue with works from the Museum’s own holdings.

Of the many bronze portraits of Hadrian that are known to have existed, only three survive. The Israel Museum’s bronze, which was found in a Roman legion camp near Beth Shean in the north of Israel, depicts the emperor in military garb with beautifully preserved body armor. It is flanked by two other extraordinary examples: one from the British Museum found in 1834 in the river Thames, which may have been created to commemorate Hadrian's visit to Britain in 122 CE; the other, from the collection of the Louvre, considered to have originated in Egypt or Asia Minor. Such portraits offered an important means in their time for conveying imperial authority, with statues being erected as civic and military monuments to reinforce the breadth of the Emperor Hadrian’s rule.

The return of Hadrian to Jerusalem celebrates in a way the emperor's last visit to Judea in 130 CE, contextualized through the first-time presentation of a monumental Latin dedicatory inscription erected by the 10th Roman Legion in Jerusalem in that same year. One section of the inscription was unearthed in 1903, and the other was discovered during recent excavations in 2014 by the Israel Antiquities Authority. The two parts of the inscription are joined here for the first time, on loan from The Israel Antiquities Authority and the Studium Biblicum Franciscanum Museum, Jerusalem.

Like his predecessors, Emperor Hadrian was immortalized in bronze and marble statues. These statues, which were sent throughout Rome’s provinces as a demonstration of Rome’s imperial power, possessed political as well as cultic significance, and some were venerated as the embodiment of the divine Caesar.

These three images are seemingly alike, yet each possesses a unique set of characteristics which highlight the multifaceted and contradictory character of Hadrian, known not only as an astute general and politician, but also as a benevolent ruler who was well-versed in disciplines such as architecture, geometry, literature, poetry, and philosophy. The display of the three portraits also stimulates a discussion of two diametrically opposed views of Hadrian’s rule: the accepted view of Hadrian as a scholarly peacemaker and protector who built the iconic wall across northern Britain, and the contrary perception in his own time of Hadrian as "the bone grinder," the destroyer of Judea.

The Israel Museum Website


Contact: The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
POB 71117
Jerusalem, 9171002
Israel
Tel: (972) 2 67 08 811

Twilight over Berlin: Masterworks from the Nationalgalerie, 1905–1945
JERUSALEM, ISRAEL  •  The Israel Museum  •  22 October 2015 - 7 June 2016
 
The beginning of the 20th century saw an artistic flourishing in Germany embodied in the works of the great Expressionists, and later in that of the innovative artists of the Weimar Republic. The Nazi regime sought to put an end to this artistic activity – branding it “degenerate art” – and many of the artists had to flee Germany, creating an avant-garde exiled community whose influence also reached pre-State Israel. Marking 50 years of German-Israeli diplomatic relations, the exhibition displays masterpieces from the Nationalgalerie by Kirchner, Nolde, Schmidt-Rottluff, Dix, Kandinsky, Klee, and Beckmann, among others.

The Israel Museum Website


Contact: The Israel Museum
11 Ruppin Boulevard
Hakyria
Jerusalem
Israel
Tel: (972) 2 670 88 11



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