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Calendar: United States

Events in Art and Archaeology

Garry Winogrand: <EM>Metropolitan Opera, New York, ca. 1951</EM>Gelatin silver printGarry Winogrand Archive, Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona© The Estate of Garry WinograndCourtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
Garry Winogrand: Metropolitan Opera, New York, ca. 1951
Gelatin silver print
Garry Winogrand Archive, Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona
© The Estate of Garry Winogrand
Courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
Garry Winogrand
WASHINGTON, DC, UNITED STATES  •  National Gallery of Art  •  2 March - 8 June 2014
 

The first retrospective in 25 years of work by artist Garry Winogrand (1928–1984) — the renowned photographer of New York City and of American life from the 1950s through the early 1980s — brings together the artist's most iconic images with newly printed photographs from his largely unexamined archive of late  work, brings together the artist's most iconic images with newly printed photographs from his largely unexamined archive of late work. 

More than 300 photographs in the exhibition and more than 400 in the accompanying catalogue attempt to create a portrait of Garry Winogrand — a chronicler of postwar America.

After serving in the military as a weather forecaster, Winogrand first began working as a photographer while studying painting on the G.I. Bill at Columbia University (1948–51).

The Bronx-born Winogr was enormously prolific but largely postponed the editing and printing of his work. Dying suddenly at the age of 56, he left behind approximately 6,500 rolls of film (some 250,000 images) that he had never seen, as well as proof sheets from his earlier years that he had marked but never printed. Roughly half of the photographs in the exhibition have never been exhibited or published until now; over 100 have never before been printed.

Winogrand photographed business moguls, everyday women on the street, famous actors and athletes, hippies, rodeos, politicians, soldiers, animals in zoos, car culture, airports, and antiwar demonstrators and the construction workers who beat them bloody in view of the unmoved police.

The exhibition catalogue Garry Winogrand (448 pages; $85 hardcover; $50 softcover)—published by SFMOMA in association with Yale University Press serves as the most comprehensive volume on Winogrand to date and the only compendium of the artist's work.  Five new essays and nearly 400 plates trace the artist's working methods and major themes.

After Washington, D.C., Garry Winogrand travels to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (27 June through 21 September 2014); the Jeu de Paume, Paris (14 October 2014 through 25 January 2015); and the Fundacion MAPFRE, Madrid (3 March through 10 May 2015).



National Gallery of Art Website


Contact:

National Gallery of Art
6th Street and Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC


Tel: (1) 202 737 42 15

Tokuda Yasokichi III: <EM>Y&#333;sai tsubo "k&#333;ga" (Brilliant Glazed Jar "Galaxy"),</EM> ca. 2003, porcelainThe Betsy and Robert Feinberg Collection© The Walters Art MuseumPhoto: John Dean
Tokuda Yasokichi III: Yōsai tsubo "kōga" (Brilliant Glazed Jar "Galaxy"), ca. 2003, porcelain
The Betsy and Robert Feinberg Collection
© The Walters Art Museum
Photo: John Dean
Designed for Flowers: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND, UNITED STATES  •  The Walters Art Museum  •  23 February - 11 May 2014
 
 

Japan's contemporary ceramic artists draw on traditions begun thousands of years as they create containers for the presentation of flowers.

Comprised almost exclusively of vases drawn from the Betsy and Robert Feinberg Collection, this exhibition displays a wide range of contemporary Japanese ceramic vessels produced for the traditional art of ikebana flower arranging.



The Walters Art Museum Website


Contact:

The Walters Art Museum
600 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21201


Tel: (1) 410 547 90 00

Events in Dance

American Ballet Theatre
WASHINGTON, DC, UNITED STATES  •  Kennedy Center  •  15 - 20 April 2014
 

American Ballet Theatre
Kevin McKenzie, Artistic Director
Kennedy Center Opera House Orchestra
 
Programme:

17 - 20 April 2014
Don Quixote
Choreography by Marius Petipa and Alexander Gorsky
Staged by Kevin McKenzie and Susan Jones
Music by Ludwig Minkus


15 - 16 April 2014

Works by Fokine, Gomes, and Ashton

Les Sylphides (Fokine/Chopin, Britten)
Aftereffect (Gomes/Tchaikovsky)
The Dream (Ashton/Mendelssohn)



The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Website



Detailed schedule information:
7:30 pm

Contact: The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
2700 F Street, NW
Washington, DC 20566
Tel: (1) 202 467 46 00

Events in Jazz

The Terence Blanchard Group: with special guest Lionel Loueke
WASHINGTON, DC, UNITED STATES  •  Kennedy Center  •  9 May 2014
 
The Terence Blanchard Group with special guest Lionel Loueke


The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Website



Detailed schedule information:
7:30 pm

Contact: The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
2700 F Street, NW
Washington, DC 20566
Tel: (1) 202 467 46 00

Kevin Mahogany
WASHINGTON, DC, UNITED STATES  •  Kennedy Center  •  26 April 2014
 
Vocalist Kevin Mahogany returns to the Kennedy Center with a blues-heavy set celebrating his 20-year career as an artist

The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Website



Detailed schedule information:
7:30 pm

Contact: The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
2700 F Street, NW
Washington, DC 20566
Tel: (1) 202 467 46 00

Events in Pop Culture and Cinema

American Cool
WASHINGTON, DC, UNITED STATES  •  National Portrait Gallery  •  7 February - 7 September 2014
 
 
American Cool features 100 photographs of icons who have contributed an original artistic vision to American culture and are symbolic figures of their time.

Cool is an original American concept and remains a global obsession. In the early 1940s, legendary jazz saxophonist Lester Young brought this central African American sensibility into the modern vernacular. Cool became a password in bohemian life connoting a balanced state of mind, a dynamic mode of performance and a certain stylish stoicism. A cool person always seems to have the situation under control with a signature style.

Cool has been embodied in jazz musicians such as Miles Davis and Billie Holiday; in actors such as Johnny Depp, Faye Dunaway and Robert Mitchum; and in singers such as Elvis Presley, Patti Smith and Jay-Z. They emerged from a variety of fields: art, music, film, sports comedy, literature and even political activism. “American Cool” is the zeitgeist taking embodied form.



The National Portrait Gallery Website


Contact: The National Portrait Gallery
Donald W. Reynolds Center for American Art and Portraiture
Eighth and F streets N.W., Washington, D.C.

Tel: (1) 202 633 10 00

Joanne Shenandoah (Oneida) From the Haudenosaunee Nation of central New York State, Shenandoah blends Iroquois songs with traditional and western instruments. A leader in the genre of contemporary Native music, her music addresses everything from Native American struggles and issues, to love, relationships, and the environment. Photo by James MahshiePhoto courtesy of National Museum of the American Indian
Joanne Shenandoah (Oneida)
From the Haudenosaunee Nation of central New York State, Shenandoah blends Iroquois songs with traditional and western instruments. A leader in the genre of contemporary Native music, her music addresses everything from Native American struggles and issues, to love, relationships, and the environment.
Photo by James Mahshie
Photo courtesy of National Museum of the American Indian
Our Lives: Contemporary Life and Identities
WASHINGTON, D.C., UNITED STATES  •  National Museum of the American Indian  •  21 September 2004 - 1 January 2015
 
Our Lives reveals how residents of eight Native communities—the Campo Band of Kumeyaay Indians (California, USA), the urban Indian community of Chicago (Illinois, USA), Yakama Nation (Washington State, USA), Igloolik (Nunavut, Canada), Kahnawake (Quebec, Canada), Saint-Laurent Metis (Manitoba, Canada), Kalinago (Carib Territory, Dominica), and the Pamunkey Tribe (Virginia, USA)—live in the 21st century. Through their stories, visitors learn about the deliberate and often difficult choices indigenous people make in order to survive economically, save their languages from extinction, preserve their cultural integrity, and keep their traditional arts alive.

The main section of Our Lives centers on various layers of identity. For Native people, identity—who you are, how you dress, what you think, where you fit in, and how you see yourself in the world—has been shaped by language, place, community membership, social and political consciousness, and customs and beliefs.

National Museum of the American Indian Web Site


Contact: Tel: (1) 202 633 10 00



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