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Events in Art and Archaeology

Armenia !
NEW YORK  •  Metropolitan Museum of Art  •  22 September 2018 - 13 January 2019
 

This is the first major U. S. exhibition to explore the remarkable artistic and cultural achievements of the Armenian people in a global context over fourteen centuries—from the fourth century, when the Armenians converted to Christianity in their homeland at the base of Mount Ararat, to the seventeenth century, when Armenian control of global trade routes first brought books printed in Armenian into the region. 

Through some 140 objects—including opulent gilded reliquaries, richly illuminated manuscripts, rare textiles, cross stones (khachkars), precious liturgical furnishings, church models, and printed books—the exhibition demonstrates how Armenians developed a unique Christian identity that linked their widespread communities over the years. 

Representing the cultural heritage of Armenia, most of the works come from major Armenian collections: the Mother See of Holy Etchmiadzin; the Matenadaran (Ancient Manuscripts); the National History Museum in the Republic of Armenia; the Catholicosate of the Great House of Cilicia in Lebanon; the Brotherhood of St. James in Jerusalem; the Mekhitarist Congregation of San Lazzaro degli Armeni in Venice; the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum in Lisbon; the Diocese of the Armenian Church (Eastern) in New York; the Armenian Museum of America in Boston; and the Alex and Marie Manoogian Museum in Michigan.



Metropolitan Museum of Art Website


Contact: Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10028

Tel: (1) 212-535-7710

Art of Native America: The Charles and Valerie Diker Collection
NEW YORK  •  Metropolitan Museum of Art  •  4 October 2018 - 6 October 2019
 
This landmark exhibition in the Museum's American Wing showcases 116 masterworks representing the achievements of artists from more than fifty cultures across North America. Ranging in date from the second to the early twentieth century, the diverse works are promised gifts, donations, and loans to The Met from the pioneering collectors Charles and Valerie Diker. Long considered to be the most significant holdings of historical Native American art in private hands, the Diker Collection has particular strengths in sculpture from British Columbia and Alaska, California baskets, pottery from southwestern pueblos, Plains drawings and regalia, and rare accessories from the eastern Woodlands.

Metropolitan Museum of Art Website


Contact:

Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10028


Tel: (1) 212-535-7710

Berthe Morisot: <EM>Winter,</EM> 1880Oil on canvasDallas Museum of Art, Gift of the Meadows Foundation, Incorporated, 1981.129Photo courtesy Dallas Museum of Art.
Berthe Morisot: Winter, 1880
Oil on canvas
Dallas Museum of Art, Gift of the Meadows Foundation, Incorporated, 1981.129
Photo courtesy Dallas Museum of Art.
Berthe Morisot: Woman Impressionist
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA  •  Barnes Foundation  •  21 October 2018 - 14 January 2019
 
This fall, the Barnes Foundation presents the US debut of a landmark exhibition exploring the significant yet under recognized contributions of Berthe Morisot (1841–1895), one of the founders of impressionism. The first monographic exhibition of the artist to be held in the US since 1987, Berthe Morisot: Woman Impressionist provides new insight into a defining chapter in art history and the opportunity to experience Morisot’s work in context of the Barnes’s unparalleled collection of impressionist, post-impressionist, and early modernist paintings. The internationally touring exhibition is co-organized by the Barnes Foundation, Dallas Museum of Art, Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, and the Musées d’Orsay et de l’Orangerie, Paris. I

Barnes Foundation Website


Contact: Barnes Foundation
2025 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19130
Tel: (1) 215.278.70 00

Bruce Nauman:<EM> Sex and Death by Murder and Suicide</EM>, 1985. Neon tubing mounted on aluminium monolith, 198 x 199 x 32 cm.&nbsp;Emanuel Hoffmann Foundation, on permanent loan to the Öffentliche Kunstsammlung Basel. Photo: Bisig &amp; Bayer, Basel.
Bruce Nauman: Sex and Death by Murder and Suicide, 1985. Neon tubing mounted on aluminium monolith, 198 x 199 x 32 cm. 
Emanuel Hoffmann Foundation, on permanent loan to the Öffentliche Kunstsammlung Basel.
Photo: Bisig & Bayer, Basel.
Bruce Nauman: Disappearing Acts
NEW YORK  •  Museum of Modern Art / MoMA PS1  •  21 October 2018 - 25 February 2019
 

First seen at Schaulager in Basel, Switzerland, this long overdue retrospective exhibition of Bruce Nauman includes video works, drawings, photographs, sculptures, neon pieces, and large-scale installations. In addition to key masterpieces, there are also lesser-known works and, as a world premiere, the 3D video projection Contrapposto Split, the monumental sculpture Leaping Foxes as well as the first ever showing in Europe of his recently created Contrapposto Studies, i through vii.

Born in the American Midwest (Fort Wayne, Indiana) in 1941, Nauman now lives and works in New Mexico. He studied mathematics, music, and physics at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, before changing his major to fine art. In 1966 he graduated with a Master of Fine Arts in sculpture from the University of California, Davis—where he had studied with William Wiley, among others.

His groundbreaking oeuvre has made him a central figure in contemporary art, exploring themes such as language and physicality while at the same time plumbing the depths of power structures and regulatory frameworks. By insistently calling into question our aesthetic and moral values, as well as our habitual ways of seeing, Bruce Nauman challenges our perceptions and imaginings in ever new ways.

Disappearing Acts traces strategies of withdrawal in Nauman’s work—both literal and figurative incidents of removal, deflection, and concealment. With a keen eye, he investigates the experience of one’s own body and its relation to space. His works often have the character of simple laboratory tests or critical self-interrogations.



Museum of Modern Art Website


Contact:

Museum of Modern Art
11 W 53rd Street
New York, NY 10019


Tel: (212) 708-9400

<P>Charles White (American, 1918-1979), Gideon, 1951. Lithograph in black on ivory wove paper, printed by Robert Blackburn (American, 1920–2003)© The Charles White Archives Inc.</P> • <P>&nbsp;</P>

Charles White (American, 1918-1979), Gideon, 1951. Lithograph in black on ivory wove paper, printed by Robert Blackburn (American, 1920–2003)
© The Charles White Archives Inc.

 

Charles White: A Retrospective
NEW YORK  •  The Museum of Modern Art  •  7 October 2018 - 13 January 2019
 
“Art must be an integral part of the struggle,” Charles White (American, 1918-1979), insisted. “It can’t simply mirror what’s taking place. … It must ally itself with the forces of liberation.” Over the course of his four-decade career, White’s commitment to creating powerful images of African Americans—what his gallerist and, later, White himself described as “images of dignity”—was unwavering. Using his virtuoso skills as a draftsman, printmaker, and painter, White developed his style and approach over time to address shifting concerns and new audiences. In each of the cities in which he lived over the course of his career—Chicago, New York, and, finally, Los Angeles—White became a key figure within a vibrant community of creative artists, writers, and activists.

White’s far-reaching vision of a socially committed practice attracted promising young artists, including many artists of color, and he became one of the 20th century’s most important and dedicated teachers. Acclaimed contemporary artists David Hammons and Kerry James Marshall were among his many students: as Marshall reflected, “Under Charles White’s influence I always knew that I wanted to make work that was about something: history, culture, politics, social issues. … It was just a matter of mastering the skills to actually do it.”

Charles White: A Retrospective is the first major museum survey devoted to the artist in over 30 years. The exhibition charts White’s full career—from the 1930s through his premature death in 1979—with over 100 works, including drawings, paintings, prints, photographs, illustrated books, record covers and archival materials.



The Museum of Modern Art Website


Contact: The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York, NY 10019
Tel: 1 (212) 708-9400

Eugène Delacroix:<EM> Le 28 Juillet : La Liberté guidant le peuple</EM>, musée du Louvre
Eugène Delacroix: Le 28 Juillet : La Liberté guidant le peuple, musée du Louvre
Delacroix
NEW YORK  •  Metropolitan Museum of Art  •  17 September 2018 - 6 January 2019
 

Eugène Delacroix was one of the giants of French painting, but his last full retrospective exhibition in Paris dates back to 1963, the centenary year of his death. In collaboration with the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Louvre is holding a historic exhibition featuring some 180 works—mostly paintings—as a tribute to his entire career.

From the young artist’s big hits at the Salons of the 1820s to his final, lesser-known, and mysterious religious paintings and landscapes, the exhibition seeks to showcase the tension that characterizes the art of Delacroix, who strove for individuality while aspiring to follow in the footsteps of the Flemish and Venetian masters of the 16th and 17th centuries.

The exhibition illuminates Delacroix's restless imagination through paintings, drawings, prints, and manuscripts—many never before seen in the United States. It unfolds chronologically, encompassing the rich variety of themes that preoccupied the artist during his more than four decades of activity, including literature, history, religion, animals, and nature. Through rarely seen graphic art displayed alongside such iconic paintings as Greece on the Ruins of Missolonghi (1826), The Battle of Nancy (1831), Women of Algiers in Their Apartment (1834), and Medea about to Kill Her Children (1838), this exhibition explores an artist whose protean genius set the bar for virtually all other French painters.



Metropolitan Museum of Art Website


Contact: Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10028

Tel: (1) 212-535-7710

<P>Tintoretto (1518-1594), <EM>Study of a seated nude,</EM> ca. 1549, black and white chalk on blue paper. Louvre 5385© RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, N.</P>

Tintoretto (1518-1594), Study of a seated nude, ca. 1549, black and white chalk on blue paper. Louvre 5385
© RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, N.

Drawing in Tintoretto’s Venice
NEW YORK  •  The Morgan Library & Museum  •  12 October 2018 - 6 January 2019
 

Jacopo Tintoretto (1518–1594) was among the most distinctive artists of the Italian Renaissance, but his drawings have never received the attention they deserve and remain unfamiliar even to many scholars. Drawing in Tintoretto’s Venice is the first exhibition since 1956 to explore the drawing practice of this major figure of the Venetian Renaissance and offers an entirely new perspective on Tintoretto’s evolution as a draftsman, his individuality as an artist, and his influence on a generation of painters in northern Italy. An introductory section of the exhibition showcases works by Titian, Veronese, Bassano, and other contemporaries as a way to understand both Tintoretto’s sources as well as his originality. The heart of the show, featuring Tintoretto’s distinctive figure drawings—both preparatory drawings and a group of studies after sculptures by Michelangelo and others—examines the use of drawings within the studio as well as teaching practices in the workshop. A following section focuses on artists—Domenico Tintoretto, Palma Giovane, and others working in Venice during the late sixteenth century—whose drawing style was influenced by Tintoretto’s, while in a final section, visitors will be able to consider an interesting group of drawings, previously attributed to Tintoretto or to Palma Giovane, which have recently been proposed as the work of the young El Greco during his time in Italy.

The exhibition brings together more than seventy drawings and a small group of related paintings from nearly two dozen public and private collections in Europe and the United States, including the Morgan Library & Museum, the National Gallery of Art (NGA), the Uffizi, the Louvre, and the British Museum, among others. Organized to mark the five-hundredth anniversary of the artist’s birth, this presentation coincides in New York with the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s exhibition of Tintoretto portraits.

When it travels to the NGA in March 2019, it will join a major retrospective of his paintings



The Morgan Library & Museum Website


Contact: The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10016
Tel: (1) (212) 685-0008

Glenn Ligon: What We Said The Last Time
NEW YORK  •  Luhring Augustine  •  27 February - 2 April 2016
 

Luhring Augustine presents What We Said The Last Time, an exhibition of new work by Glenn Ligon, and Entanglements, a curatorial project by the artist. A companion exhibition entitled We Need To Wake Up Cause That’s What Time It Is opened at Luhring Augustine Bushwick on January 16th and remains on view through 17 April 2016. 

What We Said The Last Time features a suite of seventeen inkjet prints that document the paint-spattered pages of the artist’s well-worn copy of James Baldwin’s seminal 1953 essay “Stranger in the Village.” Written during a stay in a remote Swiss mountain hamlet, Baldwin’s text examines complex and urgent questions around blackness, culture, and history. Since 1996, Ligon has used the essay as the basis of his “Stranger” series, including prints, drawings, and dense paintings made with oil stick and often coal dust that oscillate between legibility and obscurity. While creating these canvases, Ligon kept pages of Baldwin’s essay on his studio table for reference, and over the years they became covered with random smudges of black paint, oil stains, and fingerprints. Intrigued by this accumulation of marks, Ligon transformed the book pages into a suite of large-scale prints, using the full text of the essay for the first time in his career. The resulting work is a palimpsest of accumulated personal histories that suggests Ligon’s long engagement with Baldwin’s essay, as well as a new strategy in his ongoing exploration of the interplay between language and abstraction.

Also on view is Entanglements, a curatorial project by Ligon that examines how artists use the studio as a base from which to engage momentous cultural shifts and political events in both direct and oblique ways.  Key to the exhibition is Bruce Nauman’s Violin Tuned D.E.A.D. (1968), a video that presents the artist repetitively playing a single note on a violin with his back to the camera. While discussions of Nauman’s video works from this period have focused on issues of performativity, endurance, and the body, Ligon was interested in how Nauman’s discordant note can be heard as a soundtrack to the war in Vietnam or the brutal violence faced by civil rights workers. While not directly commenting on these issues, the ominous soundscape of Violin Tuned D.E.A.D. nevertheless suggests Nauman’s engagement with that turbulent moment in American history and served as a point of departure for Ligon to consider other works in which the artist’s studio has acted as a conduit for contemporary events. Ligon’s selections posit new identities, conversations or modes of sociability as a response to pressing social and political issues.  Entanglements features artworks and ephemera by Felix Gonzalez-Torres, David Hammons, On Kawara, Glenn Ligon, Bruce Nauman, Adrian Piper, Bob Thompson, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, and Andy Warhol. 

Glenn Ligon lives and works in New York.



Luhring Augustine Website


Contact: Luhring Augustine
531 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011
Tel: (1) 212 206 91 00

Lola Álvarez Bravo, Untitled, 1954.Gelatin silver print. Center for Creative PhotographyUniversity of Arizona: Lola Álvarez Bravo Archive 93.6.70 © 1995 Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona Foundation.
Lola Álvarez Bravo, Untitled, 1954.
Gelatin silver print. Center for Creative Photography
University of Arizona: Lola Álvarez Bravo Archive 93.6.70
© 1995 Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona Foundation.
Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico
ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI  •  Pulitzer Arts Foundation  •  14 September 2018 - 16 February 2019
 
The Pulitzer Arts Foundation explores the career of pioneering Mexican photographer Lola Álvarez Bravo (1903 – 1993) with an exhibition of images that she considered to be her personal photography. Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico presents nearly 50 photographs and photomontages spanning Álvarez Bravo’s fivedecade career. Together, these illuminate the ways in which her modernist aesthetic, with meticulous attention to pattern, light, and composition, contributed to her depictions of Mexico’s diverse inhabitants and landscapes as she traveled the country documenting life in the years following the Mexican Revolution (ca. 1910– 1920).

Pulitzer Arts Foundation Website


Contact: Pulitzer Arts Foundation
3716 Washington Boulevard
St. Louis, MO 63108
Tel: (1) 314 754 18 50

<P>Kawanabe Ky&#333;sai: <EM>Hell Courtesan</EM>, 1885/89Weston Collection</P>

Kawanabe Kyōsai: Hell Courtesan, 1885/89
Weston Collection

Painting the Floating World: Ukiyo-e Masterpieces from the Weston Collection
CHICAGO  •  Art Institute of Chicago  •  4 November 2018 - 27 January 2019
 

In the 17th century, Kyoto, Osaka, and Edo (now Tokyo) were Japan’s thriving cities, complete with bustling entertainment districts where ukiyo, or the “floating world,” was born. People of all ranks shared in the enjoyment of the floating world’s attractions—brothels, kabuki theater, and seasonal festivities. Artists of the period captured this popular phenomena in ukiyo-e, or “pictures of the floating world.” Over the last 25 years, Roger Weston has assembled an outstanding collection of ukiyo-e paintings—masterpieces by the most famed artists of the day. This exhibition, the first public showing of his comprehensive ukiyo-e painting collection in the United States, showcases the sheer beauty of floating world painting and offers an exclusive view of the urban amusements of early modern Japan.

In contrast to ukiyo-e woodblock prints, which were created in multiples and consequently well circulated, ukiyo-e paintings were one-of-a-kind works commissioned from the same artists celebrated for their prints, including Katsushika Hokusai and Kitagawa Utamaro. Lavish and unique objects, the paintings were conceived in various forms—folding screens, hanging scrolls, handscrolls, and albums—and emphasize the makers’ talent and technical skill. Until recently, these compelling works were not often collected in large numbers outside of Japan, making the quality and range of the Weston Collection all the more extraordinary.



Art Institute of Chicago Website


Contact: Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60603
Tel: (312) 443-3600

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