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Calendar: United States

Events in Art and Archaeology

Kemang Wa Lehulere: In All My Wildest Dreams
CHICAGO, UNITED STATES  •  Art Institute of Chicago  •  27 October 2016 - 16 January 2017
 
The focus series exhibition In All My Wildest Dreams is the first American museum show devoted to the work of Kemang Wa Lehulere (born Cape Town, 1984). Internationally recognized for his masterful conflation of personal and collective storytelling, Wa Lehulere reenacts what he calls “deleted scenes” from South African history, often animating individual narratives of exile or displacement through means that are ephemeral, found, and notational—chalk drawings on blackboard surfaces, intense but short-lived performances, salvaged wood from old school desks, sketchbook pages, letters written to friends, strangers, and public institutions—as if to suggest the gallery as a fantastical, crucially temporary classroom. “History continually disappears,” Wa Lehulere has said. “It comes and goes. It is not something fixed; it is malleable. . . . It is the elasticity of history that excites me.” At the same time, he describes his work as a “protest against forgetting”; history is constructed, and memory is fragile.

Art Institute of Chicago Website


Contact: Art Institute of Chicago
111 S Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL 60603

Tel: (1) 312 443 36 00

Tattoo
CHICAGO, UNITED STATES  •  The Field Museum  •  21 October 2016 - 30 April 2017
 

The exhibition explores the global phenomenon of tattooing around the world over time, shedding light on this often-misunderstood art form.

This will be the first time that the exhibition, which was initially developed by Paris’s musée du quai Branly - Jacques Chirac, will be on display in the United States. The exhibition, which will run until April 30, 2017, features 170 objects telling the story of tattooing, including historical artifacts and intricate contemporary designs tattooed onto silicone models of the human body.

Visitors to the exhibition will learn that people have been marking their skin as a means of expression for more than five thousand years—there’s evidence that the ancient Egyptians practiced tattooing, and the body of a naturally mummified man found in the Italian Alps (“Ötzi”) from 3330 BC is covered in 61 tattoos. The methods of tattooing vary widely across time and place—for instance, Thomas Edison held the first patent on a nineteenth-century “puncturing pen” that served as inspiration for the first electric tattooing machines—and the stories behind the tattoos vary even more. The exhibition features a seventeenth-century tattoo stamp for Christian pilgrims to Jerusalem to commemorate their journey; meanwhile, it tells the stories of contemporary tattooists like Whang-od Oggay, a 98-year-old Filipina artist who carries on traditional methods that are thousands of years old.



Contact: The Field Museum
1400 S. Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, IL 60605-2496
Tel: (1) 312 922 9410.

László Moholy-Nagy
László Moholy-Nagy
Moholy-Nagy: Future Present
CHICAGO, UNITED STATES  •  Art Institute of Chicago  •  30 September 2016 - 3 January 2017
 
Painting, photography, film, sculpture, advertising, product design, theater sets—László Moholy-Nagy (American, born Hungary, 1895–1946) did it all. Future Present, the first comprehensive retrospective of Moholy-Nagy’s work in the United States in nearly 50 years, brings together more than 300 works to survey the career of a multimedia artist who was always ahead of his time. Moholy, as he was known, came to prominence as a professor at the Bauhaus art school in Germany (1923–28). In 1937 he founded the New Bauhaus in Chicago, a school that continues today as the Institute of Design at the Illinois Institute of Technology. He remains the most renowned international modern artist ever to have resided in Chicago.

Art Institute of Chicago Website


Contact: Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60603-6404
Tel: (1) 312 443 36 00

BMO Harris Bank Chicago Works: Andrew Yang
CHICAGO, UNITED STATES  •  Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago  •  26 July - 31 December 2016
 
 
In Andrew Yang’s (American, b. 1973) first solo museum exhibition, the artist and trained biologist contemplates our relation to the Milky Way, to which the majority of people have no basic visual access. Yang attempts to close this distance in a work that explores our shared elemental equivalencies; as inherent parts of the Milky Way galaxy, our corporeal bodies are, in a very real sense, celestial bodies.

Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago Website


Contact: Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago
220 E Chicago Ave
Chicago, Illinois 60611
Tel: (1) 312 280 26 60

Unidentified artist, active in South America. <EM>Saint Francis Xavier</EM>, 18th centuryCarl and Marilynn Thoma Collection.
Unidentified artist, active in South America. Saint Francis Xavier, 18th century
Carl and Marilynn Thoma Collection.
Doctrine and Devotion: Art of the Religious Orders in the Spanish Andes
CHICAGO, UNITED STATES  •  Art Institute of Chicago  •  19 March 2016 - 25 June 2017
 
 
Presenting 13 paintings by South American artists from the 17th through 19th century, this focused exhibition introduces visitors to images promoted by several Catholic orders at work in the Spanish Andes—the Dominicans, Franciscans, Mercedarians, and Jesuits—examining the politics of the distinct iconographies each group developed as they vied for devotees and dominion.

Francisco Pizarro arrived in Peru with a mandate from Charles V to impose Spanish law and order, as well as the Roman Catholic religion, upon the indigenous Inca society that he encountered. The enormous task of converting the indigenous peoples of Spain’s overseas territories to Christianity fell largely to missionaries from several religious orders rather than parish clergy. For a native population that had no written language tradition, the missionaries relied heavily on works of art to illustrate their sermons and lessons and help them gain converts.

In the wake of the Protestant Reformation, the Catholic church embraced the use of images both as pedagogical tools and instruments of devotion, and the religious orders in South America relied on them in similar ways—as didactic materials employed in the teaching of new converts, and in later years as a means of spreading devotions specific to their own interests. While their ultimate goals were the same, each religious order promoted images specific to their own histories, identities, and goals. This exhibition explores examples of the iconographies that were particular to each group.

Art Institute of Chicago Website


Contact: 111 S Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL 60603

Tel: (1) 312 443 36 00



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