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Events in Art and Archaeology

Art of Native America: The Charles and Valerie Diker Collection
NEW YORK  •  Metropolitan Museum of Art  •  4 October 2018 - 6 October 2019
 
This landmark exhibition in the Museum's American Wing showcases 116 masterworks representing the achievements of artists from more than fifty cultures across North America. Ranging in date from the second to the early twentieth century, the diverse works are promised gifts, donations, and loans to The Met from the pioneering collectors Charles and Valerie Diker. Long considered to be the most significant holdings of historical Native American art in private hands, the Diker Collection has particular strengths in sculpture from British Columbia and Alaska, California baskets, pottery from southwestern pueblos, Plains drawings and regalia, and rare accessories from the eastern Woodlands.

Metropolitan Museum of Art Website


Contact:

Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10028


Tel: (1) 212-535-7710

Bruce Nauman:<EM> Sex and Death by Murder and Suicide</EM>, 1985. Neon tubing mounted on aluminium monolith, 198 x 199 x 32 cm.&nbsp;Emanuel Hoffmann Foundation, on permanent loan to the Öffentliche Kunstsammlung Basel. Photo: Bisig &amp; Bayer, Basel.
Bruce Nauman: Sex and Death by Murder and Suicide, 1985. Neon tubing mounted on aluminium monolith, 198 x 199 x 32 cm. 
Emanuel Hoffmann Foundation, on permanent loan to the Öffentliche Kunstsammlung Basel.
Photo: Bisig & Bayer, Basel.
Bruce Nauman: Disappearing Acts
NEW YORK  •  Museum of Modern Art / MoMA PS1  •  21 October 2018 - 25 February 2019
 

First seen at Schaulager in Basel, Switzerland, this long overdue retrospective exhibition of Bruce Nauman includes video works, drawings, photographs, sculptures, neon pieces, and large-scale installations. In addition to key masterpieces, there are also lesser-known works and, as a world premiere, the 3D video projection Contrapposto Split, the monumental sculpture Leaping Foxes as well as the first ever showing in Europe of his recently created Contrapposto Studies, i through vii.

Born in the American Midwest (Fort Wayne, Indiana) in 1941, Nauman now lives and works in New Mexico. He studied mathematics, music, and physics at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, before changing his major to fine art. In 1966 he graduated with a Master of Fine Arts in sculpture from the University of California, Davis—where he had studied with William Wiley, among others.

His groundbreaking oeuvre has made him a central figure in contemporary art, exploring themes such as language and physicality while at the same time plumbing the depths of power structures and regulatory frameworks. By insistently calling into question our aesthetic and moral values, as well as our habitual ways of seeing, Bruce Nauman challenges our perceptions and imaginings in ever new ways.

Disappearing Acts traces strategies of withdrawal in Nauman’s work—both literal and figurative incidents of removal, deflection, and concealment. With a keen eye, he investigates the experience of one’s own body and its relation to space. His works often have the character of simple laboratory tests or critical self-interrogations.



Museum of Modern Art Website


Contact:

Museum of Modern Art
11 W 53rd Street
New York, NY 10019


Tel: (212) 708-9400

Glenn Ligon: What We Said The Last Time
NEW YORK  •  Luhring Augustine  •  27 February - 2 April 2016
 

Luhring Augustine presents What We Said The Last Time, an exhibition of new work by Glenn Ligon, and Entanglements, a curatorial project by the artist. A companion exhibition entitled We Need To Wake Up Cause That’s What Time It Is opened at Luhring Augustine Bushwick on January 16th and remains on view through 17 April 2016. 

What We Said The Last Time features a suite of seventeen inkjet prints that document the paint-spattered pages of the artist’s well-worn copy of James Baldwin’s seminal 1953 essay “Stranger in the Village.” Written during a stay in a remote Swiss mountain hamlet, Baldwin’s text examines complex and urgent questions around blackness, culture, and history. Since 1996, Ligon has used the essay as the basis of his “Stranger” series, including prints, drawings, and dense paintings made with oil stick and often coal dust that oscillate between legibility and obscurity. While creating these canvases, Ligon kept pages of Baldwin’s essay on his studio table for reference, and over the years they became covered with random smudges of black paint, oil stains, and fingerprints. Intrigued by this accumulation of marks, Ligon transformed the book pages into a suite of large-scale prints, using the full text of the essay for the first time in his career. The resulting work is a palimpsest of accumulated personal histories that suggests Ligon’s long engagement with Baldwin’s essay, as well as a new strategy in his ongoing exploration of the interplay between language and abstraction.

Also on view is Entanglements, a curatorial project by Ligon that examines how artists use the studio as a base from which to engage momentous cultural shifts and political events in both direct and oblique ways.  Key to the exhibition is Bruce Nauman’s Violin Tuned D.E.A.D. (1968), a video that presents the artist repetitively playing a single note on a violin with his back to the camera. While discussions of Nauman’s video works from this period have focused on issues of performativity, endurance, and the body, Ligon was interested in how Nauman’s discordant note can be heard as a soundtrack to the war in Vietnam or the brutal violence faced by civil rights workers. While not directly commenting on these issues, the ominous soundscape of Violin Tuned D.E.A.D. nevertheless suggests Nauman’s engagement with that turbulent moment in American history and served as a point of departure for Ligon to consider other works in which the artist’s studio has acted as a conduit for contemporary events. Ligon’s selections posit new identities, conversations or modes of sociability as a response to pressing social and political issues.  Entanglements features artworks and ephemera by Felix Gonzalez-Torres, David Hammons, On Kawara, Glenn Ligon, Bruce Nauman, Adrian Piper, Bob Thompson, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, and Andy Warhol. 

Glenn Ligon lives and works in New York.



Luhring Augustine Website


Contact: Luhring Augustine
531 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011
Tel: (1) 212 206 91 00

The New Greek Galleries: Greek and Roman Art Galleries
NEW YORK  •  Metropolitan Museum of Art  •  20 April 1999 - 1 January 2019
 
Following several years of planning and construction, seven completely renovated and reinstalled galleries for Greek art are open to the public on the Museum's first floor. This latest stage in a three-phase expansion of the exhibition space devoted to Greek and Roman art comprises the Mary and Michael Jaharis Gallery—the grand vaulted gallery that was formerly known as the Cypriot corridor, now fully skylit from above and clad in limestone walls as originally envisioned by McKim, Mead and White in 1917—and the six flanking galleries for Archaic and Classical Greek art, restored.

Metropolitan Museum of Art Web Site


Contact: Tel: (1) 212 535 77 10

Jewelry: The Body Transformed
NEW YORK  •  Metropolitan Museum of Art  •  12 November 2018 - 24 February 2019
 
What is jewelry? Why do we wear it? What meanings does it carry? Traversing time and space, this exhibition explores how jewelry acts upon and activates the body it adorns. This global conversation about one of the most personal and universal of art forms brings together some 230 objects drawn almost exclusively from The Met collection. A dazzling array of headdresses and ear ornaments, brooches and belts, necklaces and rings will be shown along with sculptures, paintings, prints, and photographs that will enrich and amplify the many stories of transformation that jewelry tells.

Metropolitan Museum of Art Website


Contact: Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10028


Tel: (1) 212-535-7710



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