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Events in Art and Archaeology

Opening of Bechtler Museum of Modern Art
CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA  •  Bechtler Museum of Modern Art,  •  2 January 2010 - 2 January 2015
 
The museum is named after the family of Andreas Bechtler, a Charlotte resident and native of Switzerland who inherited and assembled a collection of more than 1,400 artworks created by major figures of 20th-century modernism. He donated the collection to the public trust. The Bechtler collection reflects most of the important art movements and schools from the 20th century with a deep holding of the School of Paris.

The collection comprises artworks by seminal figures such as Alberto Giacometti, Joan Miro, Jean Tinguely, Max Ernst, Andy Warhol, Alexander Calder, Le Corbusier, Sol LeWitt, Edgar Degas, Nicolas de Stael, Barbara Hepworth and Picasso.

The 35,600-square-foot Bechtler museum building was designed by the Swiss architect  Mario Botta.



Bechtler Museum of Modern Art


Please click here for a Culturekiosque article on the opening of the Bechtler Museum of Modern Art in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Contact: Bechtler Museum of Modern Art
420 South Tryon Street
Charlotte, North Carolina
Tel: (1) 704 353 92 00

Charles MarvilleHôtel de la Marine, c. 1870Diana and Mallory Walker Fund2006.23.1
Charles Marville
Hôtel de la Marine, c. 1870
Diana and Mallory Walker Fund
2006.23.1
Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris
HOUSTON, TEXAS  •  Museum of Fine Arts, Houston  •  15 June - 14 September 2014
 
After Washington, DC and New York, the first exhibition in the United States and the very first scholarly catalogue on the renowned 19th-century French photographer Charles Marville arrive in Houston, Texas. The showl presents recently discovered, groundbreaking scholarship informing his art, including his identity, background, and family life. Charles Marville, 1813–1879 includes some 100 photographs that represent the artist's entire career, from his city scenes and landscape and architectural studies of Europe in the early 1850s to his compelling photographs of Paris and its environs in the late 1870s.

Marville has remained a mystery for so long partly because documents that would shed light on his biography were thought to have disappeared in a fire that consumed Paris' city hall in 1871. The whereabouts of others were simply unknown. However, new research has uncovered a wealth of documents that have been critical in reconstructing Marville's personal and professional biography.

Exhibition curator Sarah Kennel and independent researcher Daniel Catan have made discoveries in Parisian archives that have provided the basis for a completely new history of Marville. The most important revelation is his given name: Charles-François Bossu. Born into an established Parisian family in 1813 (and not 1816, as previously thought), the young Bossu adopted the pseudonym Marville just as he was embarking on a career as an illustrator and painter in the early 1830s. Although he continued to be known as Marville until his death in Paris on June 1, 1879, (two facts also just uncovered), he never formally changed his name and therefore many of the legal documents pertaining to his life have gone unnoticed for decades.

Kennel and Catan have not only established Marville's biography, including his parentage and his relationship with a lifelong companion (named in his will), but also uncovered many significant details that illuminate the evolution and circumstances of his career.

The exhibition is accompanied by the first fully illustrated scholarly catalogue on Marville, written by Kennel; Peter Barberie, Philadelphia Museum of Art; and Anne de Mondenard, Mission de la Photographie, Ministère de la Culture, France.



Museum of Fine Arts, Houston Website


Please click here for a Culturekiosque exhibition review of Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris.

Contact: Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
1001 Bissonnet
Houston, Texas 77005
Tel: (1) 713 639 73 00

Garry Winogrand: <EM>Metropolitan Opera, New York, ca. 1951</EM>Gelatin silver printGarry Winogrand Archive, Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona© The Estate of Garry WinograndCourtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
Garry Winogrand: Metropolitan Opera, New York, ca. 1951
Gelatin silver print
Garry Winogrand Archive, Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona
© The Estate of Garry Winogrand
Courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
Garry Winogrand
NEW YORK  •  Metropolitan Museum of Art  •  27 June - 21 September 2014
 

The first retrospective in 25 years of work by artist Garry Winogrand (1928–1984) — the renowned photographer of New York City and of American life from the 1950s through the early 1980s — brings together the artist's most iconic images with newly printed photographs from his largely unexamined archive of late  work, brings together the artist's most iconic images with newly printed photographs from his largely unexamined archive of late work. 

More than 300 photographs in the exhibition and more than 400 in the accompanying catalogue attempt to create a portrait of Garry Winogrand — a chronicler of postwar America.

After serving in the military as a weather forecaster, Winogrand first began working as a photographer while studying painting on the G.I. Bill at Columbia University (1948–51).

The Bronx-born Winogr was enormously prolific but largely postponed the editing and printing of his work. Dying suddenly at the age of 56, he left behind approximately 6,500 rolls of film (some 250,000 images) that he had never seen, as well as proof sheets from his earlier years that he had marked but never printed. Roughly half of the photographs in the exhibition have never been exhibited or published until now; over 100 have never before been printed.

Winogrand photographed business moguls, everyday women on the street, famous actors and athletes, hippies, rodeos, politicians, soldiers, animals in zoos, car culture, airports, and antiwar demonstrators and the construction workers who beat them bloody in view of the unmoved police.

The exhibition catalogue Garry Winogrand (448 pages; $85 hardcover; $50 softcover)—published by SFMOMA in association with Yale University Press serves as the most comprehensive volume on Winogrand to date and the only compendium of the artist's work.  Five new essays and nearly 400 plates trace the artist's working methods and major themes.

After New York, Garry Winogrand travels to the Jeu de Paume, Paris (14 October 2014 through 25 January 2015); and the Fundacion MAPFRE, Madrid (3 March through 10 May 2015).



Metropolitan Museum of Art Web Site


Contact: Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York 10028
Tel: (1) 212 535 77 10

Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe
NEW YORK  •  Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum  •  21 February - 1 September 2014
 
This multidisciplinary exhibition examines the historical sweep of the movement from its inception with F. T. Marinetti’s Futurist manifesto in 1909 through its demise at the end of World War II. Presenting over 300 works executed between 1909 and 1944, the chronological exhibition encompasses not only painting and sculpture, but also architecture, design, ceramics, fashion, film, photography, advertising, free-form poetry, publications, music, theater, and performance. To convey the myriad artistic languages employed by the Futurists as they evolved over a 35-year period, the exhibition integrates multiple disciplines in each section.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Website


Contact: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue
(at 89th Street)
New York, NY 10128-0173

Tel: (1) 212 423 35 87

<P>Josef Koudelka: <EM>Invasión 68 Praga</EM> (Invasion 68 Prague)Photo courtesy of  Espacio de Arte de Fundación OSDE</P>

Josef Koudelka: Invasión 68 Praga (Invasion 68 Prague)
Photo courtesy of  Espacio de Arte de Fundación OSDE

Josef Koudelka: Nationality Doubtful
CHICAGO  •  Art Institute of Chicago  •  7 June - 14 September 2014
 
Czech-born French artist Josef Koudelka belongs in the firmament of classic photographers working today. Honored with the French Prix Nadar (1978), the Hasselblad Prize (1992), and the International Center of Photography Infinity Award (2004), Koudelka is also a leading member of the world-renowned photo agency Magnum. This exhibition, his first retrospective in the United States since 1988, is also the first museum show ever to emphasize his original vintage prints, period books, magazines, and significant unpublished materials.

Choosing exile to avoid reprisals for his Invasion photographs, Koudelka traveled throughout Europe during the 1970s and 1980s, camping at village festivals from spring through fall and then printing in wintertime. His photographs of those decades became the series Exiles. Since the late 1980s Koudelka has made panoramic landscape photographs in areas massively shaped by industry, territorial conflict, or—in the case of the Mediterranean rim—the persistence of Classical civilization.

A fully illustrated catalogue accompanies the exhibition, which after its debut at the Art Institute travels to the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, and Fundación MAPFRE, Madrid.

Art Institute of Chicago Website


Contact: Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60603-6404
Tel: (1) 312 443 36 00

<P>René Magritte: <EM>Les Amants/Die</EM> <EM>Liebenden</EM>, 1928 </P>

René Magritte: Les Amants/Die Liebenden, 1928

Magritte: The Mystery of the Ordinary, 1926–1938
CHICAGO  •  Art Institute of Chicago  •  24 June - 13 October 2014
 
This exhibition, the first major museum show to focus on the artist’s most inventive and experimental years, features over 100 paintings, collages, drawings, and objects, along with a selection of photographs, periodicals, and early commercial work, that trace the birth of the themes and strategies Magritte would go on to use throughout his long, productive career.

Art Institute of Chicago Website


Contact: Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60603-6404
Tel: (1) 312 443 36 00

Robert Heinecken
Robert Heinecken
Robert Heinecken: Object Matter
NEW YORK  •  The Museum of Modern Art  •  15 March - 7 September 2014
 

Robert Heinecken (1931–2006) was a pioneer in the postwar Los Angeles art scene. Describing himself as a “para-photographer,” because his work stood “beside” or “beyond” traditional ideas associated with photography, Heinecken worked across multiple mediums, including photography, sculpture, video, printmaking, and collage. Culling images from newspapers, magazines, pornography, and television, he recontextualized them through collage and assemblage, double-sided photograms, darkroom experimentation, and rephotography. Although Heinecken was rarely behind the lens of a camera, his photo-based works question the nature of photography and radically redefine the perception of it as an artistic medium. His works explore themes of commercialism, Americana, kitsch, sex, the body, and gender. In doing so, they also expose his obsession with popular culture and its effects on society, and with the relationship between the original and the copy.

This survey exhibition covers five decades of the artist’s remarkable, unique practice, from the early 1960s through the late 1990s. Although Heinecken was prolific, this exhibition is a focused presentation of his major works, emphasizing early experiments that investigated technique and materiality and sought to destabilize the very definition of photography.



The Museum of Modern Art Website


Contact: The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street,
between Fifth and Sixth avenues
New York, NY 10019-5497



Tel: (1) 212 708 94 00

Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People
NEW YORK  •  Film Forum  •  27 August - 9 September 2014
 
Film Forum presents the US premiere of Thomas Allen Harris’s Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People. Inspired by Deborah Willis’s groundbreaking book, Reflections in Black (Willis is also a co-producer), the documentary casts a broad net that begins with filmmaker Harris’s family album. It considers the difference between black photographers who use the camera to define themselves, their people, and their culture and some white photographers who, historically, have demeaned African-Americans through racist imagery. The film embraces both historical material (African-Americans who were slaves, who fought in the Civil War, were victims of lynchings, or were pivotal in the Civil Rights Movement) and contemporary images made by such luminaries as Roy DeCarava, Gordon Parks, and Carrie Mae Weems. Through a Lens Darkly is a cornucopia of Americana that reveals deeply disturbing truths about the history of race relations, while expressing joyous, life-affirming sentiments about the ability of artists and amateurs alike to assert their identity through the photographic lens.

Film Forum Website



Detailed schedule information:
Screenings daily at 12:45, 2:50, 5:10, 7:20, 9:30

Contact: Film Forum
209 West Houston Street
New York, NY
Tel: (1) 212 727 81 10

Yinka Shonibare MBE: Wind Series
CHICAGO  •  Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago  •  16 June - 21 October 2014
 
This summer, the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago presents the London-based artist Yinka Shonibare MBE, the next artist for the annual plaza series. Shonibare’s installation premieres three sculptures from his new Wind Series. Roughly twenty feet high, each monumental sculpture captures the movement of a billowing bolt of fabric, with designs inspired by the sails of ships, and patterns derived from Dutch wax fabric, or “African” batik. Shonibare works with these iconic fabrics to consider how signs of national or ethnic identity are culturally constructed.

Yinka Shonibare was born in 1962 in the United Kingdom to Nigerian parents, who returned to Lagos with their children when he was three. When he was seventeen he relocated to London, where he currently lives and works. He studied at Goldsmiths College, University of London, and at the Byam Shaw School of Art, Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, University of the Arts, London. His work has been presented in solo and group exhibitions and is in public and private collections throughout the world. In 2005 Shonibare was awarded a Member of the Order of the British Empire, MBE, a distinction he uses despite and because of its irony.

Museum of Contemporary Art Website


Contact: 220 E Chicago Ave
Chicago, Illinois 60611
Tel: (1) 312 280 26 60

<P class=caption itemprop="description">Ragnar Kjartansson: <EM>The Visitors </EM></P>

Ragnar Kjartansson: The Visitors

Ragnar Kjartansson: The Visitors
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS  •  The Institute of Contemporary Art 1  •  23 July - 2 November 2014
 
Curated by Andrea Lissoni and Heike Munder, The Visitors The Visitors consists of nine videos on a scale of 1:1, in which the audience sees different musicians, all friends of Kjartansson's (including Kristín Anna and Gyða Valtýsdóttir, founding sisters of the historic Icelandic band Múm, and Kjartan Sveinsson, keyboard player until 2012 with the famous Sigur Rós). For over an hour, the musicians, each with a different instrument, sing and play the same melody of a song called Feminine Ways. The nine scenes are set in the many rooms of the large, dilapidated nineteenth-century Rokeby Farm in Upstate New York. Ragnar Kjartansson was born in 1976 in Reykjavík (Iceland), where he lives and works. In 2013 he was invited to take part in the 55th Venice Biennale, curated by Massimiliano Gioni, during which he puts on S.S. Hangover, combining performance, sculpture and sound.

The Institute of Contemporary Art Boston Website


Contact: The Institute of Contemporary Art 100 Northern Avenue Boston, MA 02210
Tel: (1) 617 478 31 03

13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World's Fair
QUEENS, NEW YORK  •  Queens Museum  •  27 April - 7 September 2014
 
 

50 years have passed since an up-and-coming Pop provocateur named Andy Warhol sparked a minor scandal at the 1964 New York World’s Fair. As part of a prominent set of public commissions for the Philip Johnson-designed New York State Pavilion’s exterior, Warhol chose to enlarge mug shots from a NYPD booklet featuring the 13 most wanted criminals of 1962. Forming a chessboard of front and profile views, 13 Most Wanted Men was installed by April 15, 1964, and painted over by Fair officials’ direction with silver paint a few days later. When the Fair opened to the public, all that was visible was a large silver square.  Later in the summer of 1964, Warhol produced another set of the Most Wanted Men paintings with the screens he had used to make the mural and nine of these are assembled in New York for the first time since their creation, forming the core of the 175 or so objects in the exhibition.

13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World's Fair

The exhibition takes Warhol’s 13 Most Wanted Men as its single subject, addressing its creation and destruction and placing it in its artistic and social context by combining art, documentation, and archival material. Parallel to the striking, somber Men canvases, materials in the exhibition are organized in strict chronological order so the viewer can appreciate the interrelations of underground and establishment; art, protest, and gay life; painting, sculpture, and film in a key year for Warhol; fine art and mainstream culture; and the lives and careers of the major players. A sampling of paintings and sculpture from that year; artists’ and photojournalists’ documentation of the Fair and of the Factory; and never-before-displayed materials from the Andy Warhol Museum archives unwind the mystery behind who ordered the painting-over of the Men and people and places that shaped the work and the incident.



Queens Museum Website


Contact:

Queens Museum
New York City Building
Flushing Meadows Corona Park
Queens, NY 11368

 


Tel: (1) 718.592.97 00

Charles Ray: <EM>Plank Piece</EM>, 1973Gelatin silver print, printed 1992
Charles Ray: Plank Piece, 1973
Gelatin silver print, printed 1992
A World of Its Own: Photographic Practices in the Studio
NEW YORK  •  The Museum of Modern Art  •  8 February - 5 October 2014
 
 
Bringing together photographs, films, videos, and works in other mediums, A World of Its Own: Photographic Practices in the Studio examines the ways in which photographers and artists using photography have worked and experimented within the four walls of the studio space, from photography’s inception to today. Featuring both new acquisitions and works from the Museum’s collection that have not been on view in recent years, A World of Its Own includes approximately 180 works, by approximately 90 artists, such as Berenice Abbott, Uta Barth, Zeke Berman, Karl Blossfeldt, Constantin Brancusi, Geta Brătescu, Harry Callahan, Robert Frank, Jan Groover, Barbara Kasten, Man Ray, Bruce Nauman, Paul Outerbridge, Irving Penn, Adrian Piper, Edward Steichen, William Wegman, and Edward Weston.

The show is curated by Quentin Bajac.

The Museum of Modern Art Website


Contact: The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York, NY 10019
Tel: (1) 212 708 94 00

Beyond the Supersquare
BRONX, NEW YORK  •  ronx Museum of the Arts  •  1 May 2014 - 11 January 2015
 
 
Beyond the Supersquare explores the indelible influence of Latin American and Caribbean modernist architecture on contemporary art. Co-organized by Holly Block and María Inés Rodríguez, Beyond the Supersquare examines the complicated legacies of modernism through architecture and thought—as embodied by the political, economic, environmental, and social challenges faced by countries throughout Latin America—through the unique perspective of 30 artists working today.

Bronx Museum of the Arts Website


Contact: Bronx Museum of the Arts
1040 Grand Concourse at 165th Street
Bronx, New York 10456
Tel: (1) 718 681 60 00

Here and Elsewhere
NEW YORK  •  New Museum  •  16 July 2914 - 28 September 2014
 
 
Here and Elsewhere, the first museum-wide exhibition in New York City to feature contemporary art from and about the Arab world. The exhibition brings together more than forty-five artists from over fifteen countries, many of whom live and work internationally.

The exhibition borrows its title from a 1976 film-essay by French directors Jean-Luc Godard, Jean-Pierre Gorin, and Anne-Marie Miéville. Their film, Ici et ailleurs [Here and Elsewhere], was initially conceived as a pro-Palestinian documentary, but evolved into a complex reflection on the ethics of representation and the status of images as instruments of political consciousness.

Taking inspiration from Godard, Gorin, and Miéville’s film—which has had a strong impact on an entire generation of artists in various Arab countries—“Here and Elsewhere” pays particular attention to the position and role of the artist in the face of historical events. An example of personal reportage can be found in the short videos produced and distributed by Abounaddara, a collective of self-taught filmmakers dispersed throughout Syria, as well as in Bouchra Khalili’s video portraits, which reveal the clandestine journeys of migrants seeking to enter Europe.

Artists such as Hrair Sarkissian, Lamia Joreige, and Hassan Sharif undertake experimental approaches to archival material, rewriting personal and collective traumas, and weaving fragments both real and imagined into their work. Sharif, a conceptual artist in Dubai, works by accumulating surplus materials and found objects, but in contrast to the archaeological pursuits of other artists, his catalogues of manufactured goods reflect on globalized production and consumption. Ala Younis presents a visual essay, an exhibition within the exhibition, in which artworks, archival materials, and objects from popular culture are combined to analyze the representation of the Palestinian struggle within the historical context of Pan-Arabism.

For other artists, traditional mediums like painting, drawing, and sculpture record subtle and intimate shifts in awareness.

A number of pieces on view prompt a reflection on images as spaces of intimacy, such as the works of studio photographer Hashem El Madani, which through the research and efforts of artist Akram Zaatari, reveal the construction of identity at a time when studio photography flourished as a powerful and prolific site of individualized image-making.

Here and Elsewhereis accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue coedited with Negar Azimi and Kaelen Wilson-Goldie of Bidoun magazine.

New Museum Website


Contact: New Museum
235 Bowery
New York, NY 10002
Tel: (1) 212 21912 22

INFOCUS Juried Exhibition of Self-Published Photobooks
PHOENIX, ARIZONA  •  Phoenix Art Museum  •  23 August - 28 September 2014
 
 
The INFOCUS Juried Exhibition of Self-Published Photobooks explores the ways photographic artists are using newly available commercial technologies to self-publish photobooks. Entries were accepted until the end of July when a jury of seven industry professionals reviewed the 271 photobooks that came from 12 countries to select the 151 that will be on display to the public as part of the exhibition. The selected photobooks represent the diverse examples that were received and will be presented on tables in the gallery for visitors to easily view and enjoy. Phoenix Art Museum’s Norton Family Curator of Photography Rebecca Senf, Ph.D., was inspired to create this exhibition in Phoenix after learning about the DIY: Photographers & Books exhibition that was at Cleveland Museum of Art in 2012. A librarian, retail sales manager, two photography curators, two photography authors, and the founder of a photobook library made up the jury of seven industry professionals. Submissions were accepted until the end of July. Some 300 submissions were received. The photobooks came from 12 countries including Australia, Canada, England, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Russia, Ukraine and the U.S. Within the U.S. alone books came from 31 states and Puerto Rico.

Phoenix Art Museum Website


Contact: Phoenix Art Museum
1625 N. Central Avenue
Phoenix, AZ 85004-1685
Tel: (!) (602) 257 18 80

<EM>Samba Spirit: Modern Afro Brazilian Art</EM>
Samba Spirit: Modern Afro Brazilian Art
Samba Spirit: Modern Afro Brazilian Art
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS  •  Museum of Fine Arts, Boston  •  18 January - 19 October 2014
 
 

The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), presents a selection of works by 20th-century Brazilian artists of mostly African descent in Samba Spirit: Modern Afro Brazilian Art. Opening the weekend of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the exhibition includes 15 paintings and one work on paper by key artists including Heitor dos Prazeres, Maria Auxiliadoro da Silva and Waldemiro de Deus, as well as two sculptures by Agnaldo Manoel Dos Santos. Rarely studied in the United States, these artists drew on a range of traditions and found inspiration in all aspects of Brazilian culture—religious rituals, urban and rural life, music and dance.

In the 19th century, Brazil had the largest population of African slaves in the Americas and was the last to abolish the institution in 1888.  The pervasive impact of slavery on subsequent generations led one sociologist to write, “Every Brazilian, even the light-skinned fair-haired one, carries with him on his soul, when not on soul and body alike…the influence of the African, either direct or vague or remote.”  The resulting blend of African, European and indigenous cultures can be seen throughout Brazil, from the world-famous choreography of the samba and the frevo to the practices associated with the Candomblé and Umbanda faiths.  This influence extends to the visual arts as well, where the depiction of subjects and symbols related to the experiences of Afro Brazilians is prevalent.



Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Website


Contact:

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115

 


Tel: (1) 617 267 93 00

Rufino Tamayo: <EM>Retrato de Olga</EM>, 1964Oil on canvasCollection Museo Tamayo Arte Contemporaneo, Mexico City© Tamayo Heirs/Mexico/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.
Rufino Tamayo: Retrato de Olga, 1964
Oil on canvas
Collection Museo Tamayo Arte Contemporaneo, Mexico City
© Tamayo Heirs/Mexico/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.
Treasures of the Tamayo Museum, Mexico City
SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA  •  Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego  •  17 May - 31 August 2014
 
 
Treasures of the Tamayo Museum, Mexico City brings to the La Jolla location of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego highlights from one of Mexico's foremost museums of modern and contemporary art. In 1981, Rufino Tamayo (1899-1991) opened the doors of his eponymous museum, to which the Mexican artist donated both his paintings and his collection of late-modernist and contemporary art. The selections featured in this exhibition include three canvases by Tamayo--an iconic portrait of his wife Olga, a watermelon still life, and nocturnal skyscape. These paintings' distinctive bright colors and abstracted figures embody the artist's signature synthesis of the pre-Columbian imagery and folk forms of Mexico with the modernist movements of Europe and the United States.

Other selections in the exhibition reveal Tamayo's cosmopolitan approach to collecting, influenced by the various avant-garde movements he encountered during lengthy periods abroad. These works include large figurative paintings by Pablo Picasso and Francis Bacon, and a prime example of Mark Rothko's color field abstractions. The strongest of Tamayo's fellow Latin American artists are highlighted with works such as Francisco Toledo's trademark animal paintings.

Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego Website


Contact: MCASD La Jolla
700 Prospect Street
La Jolla, CA 92037-4291
Tel: (1) 858 454 35 41

<P><SPAN class=pie _extended="true">Alberto Korda: <EM>El Quixote of the Lamppost (El Quijote de la Farola), </EM>Cuba, 1959Collection Leticia and Stanislas Poniatowski</SPAN><SPAN class=pie _extended="true">© Alberto Korda</SPAN></P>

Alberto Korda: El Quixote of the Lamppost (El Quijote de la Farola), Cuba, 1959
Collection Leticia and Stanislas Poniatowski
© Alberto Korda

Urbes Mutantes: Latin American Photography 1944–2013
NEW YORK  •  International Center of Photography  •  16 May - 7 September 2014
 
 
Urbes Mutantes: Latin American Photography 1944–2013 is a major survey of photographic movements in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, Peru, and Venezuela. Taking the "mutant," morphing, and occasionally chaotic Latin American city as its focus, the exhibition draws particularly on street photography's depictions of the city during decades of political and social upheaval. It is divided into sections that explore public space as a platform for protest, popular street culture, the public face of poverty, and other characteristics of the city as described in photographs.

International Center of Photography Website


Contact:  International Center of Photography
1133 Avenue of the Americas at 43rd Street
New York, NY 10036

Tel: (1) 212 857 00 00

What May Come: The Taller de Gráfica Popular and the Mexican Political Print
CHICAGO  •  Art Institute of Chicago  •  4 July - 12 October 2014
 
 
In 1945, the Art Institute of Chicago commissioned Mexican printmaker and political activist Leopoldo Méndez to create a custom woodblock print that would be the centerpiece of the artist’s first major exhibition in the United States. Now, almost 70 years later, that print and the original woodblock Mendez carved are part of the exhibition What May Come: The Taller de Gráfica Popular and the Mexican Political Print, on view in the museum’s Jean and Steven Goldman Prints and Drawing Galleries in the Richard and Mary Gray Wing.

The Taller de Gráfica Popular (the Popular Graphic Art Workshop), or TGP, created some of the most memorable images in mid-century printmaking. The Mexico City–based workshop, founded in 1937 by Méndez, Luis Arenal and American-born Pablo O’Higgins, took up the legacy of the famous Mexican broadside illustrator José Guadalupe Posada. The group created prints, posters, and illustrated publications that were popular, affordable, legible, politically topical, and, above all, formally compelling.

In addition to the commissioned Méndez woodblock print, the exhibition includes more than 100 works from the Art Institute’s rich holdings—one of the most significant TGP collections in the United States. The range of works demonstrates why this collective boasted such international influence and inspired the establishment of print collectives around the world.

Showcasing the TGP’s prolific and varied output, What May Come is organized into thematic sections such as Chicago connections to the TGP, antifascism, national history, daily life, caricature, and popular visual traditions. A Spanish-English catalogue authored by guest curator Diane Miliotes accompanies the exhibition.

Art Institute of Chicago Website


Contact: Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60603-6404
Tel: (1) 312 443 36 00

Wynn Bullock: Revelations
ATLANTA, GEORGIA  •  High Museum of Art  •  14 June 2014 - 18 January 2015
 
 
This retrospective features the work by American photographer Wynn Bullock (1902-1975), one of the most significant photographers of the mid-20th century. Bullock worked in the American modernist tradition alongside Edward Weston, Harry Callahan and Ansel Adams. More than 100 black-and-white and color works by Bullock are brought together for the exhibition, which coincides with a major gift to the High from the Bullock Estate of a large collection of vintage photographs.

High Museum of Art Website


Contact: High Museum of Art
1280 Peachtree Street, N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30309
Tel: (1) 404 733 44 00

Events in Classical Music

Leif Ove Andsnes
Leif Ove Andsnes
San Francisco Symphony: Leif Ove Andsnes, piano
SAN FRANCISCO  •  Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall  •  10 - 13 September 2014
 
Rossini: Overture to La gazza ladra
Mason Bates: Alternative Energy
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 1

San Francisco Symphony
Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor
Leif Ove Andsnes, piano



San Francisco Symphony Website



Detailed schedule information:
8:00 pm

Contact: Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall
201 Van Ness Avenue
San Francisco, CA

Tel: (1) 415 864 60 00

Events in Pop Culture and Cinema

Dream Cars
ATLANTA, GEORGIA  •  High Museum of Art  •  21 May - 7 September 2014
 

This exhibition of innovative automotive design brings together 17 concept cars from across Europe and the U.S., including some of the rarest an most imaginative cars designed by Ferrari, Bugatti, General Motors and Porsche. Dream Cars features cars from the early 1930s to the 21st century that pushed the limits of imagination and foreshadowed the future of design. The show pairs conceptual drawings, patents and scale models with realized cars.

Highlights of Dream Cars includes:

Paul Arzens' L'Oeuf électrique (1942), an electric bubble car designed by Arzens for his personal use in Paris during the German occupation that has never before traveled to the U.S.

William Stout's Scarab (1936), the genesis of the contemporary minivan.

Marcello Gandini's Lancia (Bertone) Stratos HF Zero (1970), a wedge-shaped car that is only 33 inches tall.

Christopher Bangle's BMW GINA Light Visionary Model (2001), featuring an exterior made of fabric.

A full-scale (6 x 20 foot) rendering of a concept car by Carl Renner (1951).



High Museum of Art Website


Contact: High Museum of Art
1280 Peachtree Street, N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30309
Tel: (1) 404 733 44 00

Joanne Shenandoah (Oneida) From the Haudenosaunee Nation of central New York State, Shenandoah blends Iroquois songs with traditional and western instruments. A leader in the genre of contemporary Native music, her music addresses everything from Native American struggles and issues, to love, relationships, and the environment. Photo by James MahshiePhoto courtesy of National Museum of the American Indian
Joanne Shenandoah (Oneida)
From the Haudenosaunee Nation of central New York State, Shenandoah blends Iroquois songs with traditional and western instruments. A leader in the genre of contemporary Native music, her music addresses everything from Native American struggles and issues, to love, relationships, and the environment.
Photo by James Mahshie
Photo courtesy of National Museum of the American Indian
Our Lives: Contemporary Life and Identities
WASHINGTON, D.C.  •  National Museum of the American Indian  •  21 September 2004 - 1 January 2015
 
Our Lives reveals how residents of eight Native communities—the Campo Band of Kumeyaay Indians (California, USA), the urban Indian community of Chicago (Illinois, USA), Yakama Nation (Washington State, USA), Igloolik (Nunavut, Canada), Kahnawake (Quebec, Canada), Saint-Laurent Metis (Manitoba, Canada), Kalinago (Carib Territory, Dominica), and the Pamunkey Tribe (Virginia, USA)—live in the 21st century. Through their stories, visitors learn about the deliberate and often difficult choices indigenous people make in order to survive economically, save their languages from extinction, preserve their cultural integrity, and keep their traditional arts alive.

The main section of Our Lives centers on various layers of identity. For Native people, identity—who you are, how you dress, what you think, where you fit in, and how you see yourself in the world—has been shaped by language, place, community membership, social and political consciousness, and customs and beliefs.

National Museum of the American Indian Web Site


Contact: Tel: (1) 202 633 10 00

PterosaurPhoto: Don Emmert
Pterosaur
Photo: Don Emmert
Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs
NEW YORK  •  American Museum of Natural History  •  5 April 2014 - 4 January 2015
 

Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs, a new exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History explores the world of these extraordinary flying reptiles, the first back-boned animals to evolve powered flight. As long as dinosaurs walked the Earth, pterosaurs—ranging from the size of a sparrow to that of a small airplane—ruled the skies until they went extinct 66 million years ago.

The largest exhibition ever presented in the United States about these animals, Pterosaurs highlights the latest research by Museum scientists and leading paleontologists around the world. It also features rare pterosaur fossils from Germany, the United States, and Brazil as well as casts, life-size models, videos, and interactive exhibits that immerse visitors in the mechanics of pterosaur flight.

The exhibition is overseen by Curator Mark Norell, chair of the Division of Paleontology, who conducts pterosaur research in Romania, China, and Mongolia, with Co-curator Alexander Kellner, a Museum research associate and paleontologist at the Museu Nacional in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.



American Museum of Natural History Website


Contact: American Museum of Natural History
Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY
Tel: (1) 212-769 58 00

Bryan Cranston as Lyndon B. Johnsonin <EM>All the Way</EM> &nbsp;
Bryan Cranston as Lyndon B. Johnson
in All the Way  
All the Way: By Robert Schenkkan
NEW YORK  •  Neil Simon Theatre  •  6 March - 30 December 2014
 
 

Robert Schenkkan: All the Way
Drected by Bill Rauch

All the Way is a new play about a pivotal moment in American history. This drama takes audiences behind the doors of the Oval Office and inside the first years of Lyndon B. Johnson's (Bryan Cranston) presidency, and his fight to pass a landmark civil rights bill. The play stars Bryan Cranston as LBJ, Michael McKean as J. Edgar Hoover, and Brandon J. Dirden as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Other cast members:

 Susannah Schulman (Lurleen Wallace), J. Bernard Calloway (Ralph Abernathy), James Eckhouse (Robert McNamara), Michael McKean (J. Edgar Hoover), Steve Vinovich (Rep. Emanuel Celler), Peter Jay Fernandez (Roy Wilkins), Ethan Phillips (Stanley Levison), Bill Timoney (Senator Karl Mundt), Betsy Aidem (Lady Bird Johnson), Christopher Gurr (Senator Strom Thurmond), Roslyn Ruff (Coretta Scott King), Eric Lenox Abrams (Bob Moses), Richard Poe (Senator Everett Dirksen), John McMartin (Senator Richard Russell); (seated from left) Robert Petkoff (Senator Hubert Humphrey), Christopher Liam Moore (Walter Jenkins), playwright Robert Schenkkan, Bryan Cranston (LBJ), director Bill Rauch, Brandon J. Dirden (Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.), and William Jackson Harper (Stokely Carmichael).



Neil Simon Theatre Website


Contact: Neil Simon Theatre
250 W 52nd Street
New York, NY 10019
Tel: (1) 212 757 86 46

American Cool
WASHINGTON, DC  •  National Portrait Gallery  •  7 February - 7 September 2014
 
 
American Cool features 100 photographs of icons who have contributed an original artistic vision to American culture and are symbolic figures of their time.

Cool is an original American concept and remains a global obsession. In the early 1940s, legendary jazz saxophonist Lester Young brought this central African American sensibility into the modern vernacular. Cool became a password in bohemian life connoting a balanced state of mind, a dynamic mode of performance and a certain stylish stoicism. A cool person always seems to have the situation under control with a signature style.

Cool has been embodied in jazz musicians such as Miles Davis and Billie Holiday; in actors such as Johnny Depp, Faye Dunaway and Robert Mitchum; and in singers such as Elvis Presley, Patti Smith and Jay-Z. They emerged from a variety of fields: art, music, film, sports comedy, literature and even political activism. “American Cool” is the zeitgeist taking embodied form.



The National Portrait Gallery Website


Contact: The National Portrait Gallery
Donald W. Reynolds Center for American Art and Portraiture
Eighth and F streets N.W., Washington, D.C.

Tel: (1) 202 633 10 00

Detroit—Bruce Weber
DETROIT, MICHIGAN  •  Detroit Institute of Arts  •  20 June - 7 September 2014
 
 
The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) has partnered with Condé Nast to present an exhibition of around 80 photographs by fashion photographer and filmmaker Bruce Weber. Among them are portraits of activist Grace Lee Boggs, R&B legend Aretha Franklin, the Detroit chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen and everyday Detroiters who embody the essence of the city. Well-known Detroit locations, such as the Kronk Gym, Belle Isle Park and the Raven nightclub are also featured.

Detroit Institute of Arts Website


Contact: Detroit Institute of Arts
5200 Woodward Avenue
Detroit, Michigan 48202
Tel: (1) 313 833 79 00

Reel to Real: Portrayals and Perceptions of Gays in Hollywood
HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA  •  The Hollywood Museum  •  6 June - 26 September 2014
 
 
This exhibition features photos, costumes, props and iconic imagery and provides a unique perspective on how gays have been portrayed in Hollywood from early stereotypes to modern representations.

Some of the items displayed in the exhibition include:

Tuxedo costumes from the Days of Our Lives gay wedding, the first between two men on a soap opera

Pink coffin from True Blood designed by LGBT set decorator Ron Franco to look like a Chanel handbag

Michael Douglas' sequined Liberace suit from Behind the Candelabra (2013)

The Roddy McDowall Powder Room

Award-winning screenwriter Dustin Lance Black’s on-set chairs from Milk (2008) are showcased along with his numerous awards and Oscar® for Best Screenplay

Cocktail dress belonging to LGBT and AIDS activist Elizabeth Taylor

Photo wall with images of actors who have portrayed iconic gay characters in TV and film including Jesse Tyler Ferguson and Eric Stonestreet (Modern Family); Jake Gyllenhaal and Heath Ledger (Brokeback Mountain; Sean Hayes and Eric McCormack (Will & Grace); Nathan Lane and Robin Williams (The Birdcage) and Sean Penn and James Franco (Milk).

The Hollywood Museum Website


Contact: The Hollywood Museum
1660 N. Highland Ave. (at Hollywood Blvd)
Hollywood, CA 90028
Tel: (1) 323 464 77 76



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