TRAVEL CALENDAR
Go to:
About CK •  Art • Chef • Dance • Jazz • Klassik • Nouveau • Opera • Travel Calendar
Log In • Sign Up
You are in:  Home > Travel Calendar > Art and Archaeology in United States   •  send page to a friend




Travel Tip: Art and Archaeology in United States
And Still We Rise: Race, Culture and Visual Conversations



<P>Lucy Terry Prince: <EM>The Griot’s Voice</EM>, 2012Peggie HartwellSummerville, South Carolina47.5 x 48 in.Materials: Cotton fabric, cotton batting, cotton thread, nylon thread Techniques: Hand appliqué, machine appliqué, machine embroidery, machine quilting</P> • <P>1746: Lucy Terry, an enslaved person, becomes the earliest known African American poet when she writes about the last Native American attack on her village of Deerfield, Massachusetts. Abijah Prince, a freed slave, bought Lucy’s freedom and married her. They would become parents of six children, and Mrs. Prince would become the family spokesperson who protected their personal and family rights. Her poem, “Bar’s Fight,” will not be published until 1855.</P>

Lucy Terry Prince: The Griot's Voice, 2012
Peggie Hartwell
Summerville, South Carolina
47.5 x 48 in.
Materials: Cotton fabric, cotton batting, cotton thread, nylon thread Techniques: Hand appliqué, machine appliqué, machine embroidery, machine quilting

1746: Lucy Terry, an enslaved person, becomes the earliest known African American poet when she writes about the last Native American attack on her village of Deerfield, Massachusetts. Abijah Prince, a freed slave, bought Lucy’s freedom and married her. They would become parents of six children, and Mrs. Prince would become the family spokesperson who protected their personal and family rights. Her poem, “Bar's Fight,” will not be published until 1855.

And Still We Rise: Race, Culture and Visual Conversations
UNITED STATES
GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT  •  Bruce Museum  •  Ongoing
 

Using the powerful medium of story quilts, this exhibition narrates nearly four centuries of African American history, from the first slave ships to the first African American president and beyond. Through 40 quilts from artists of the Women of Color Quilters Network, the exhibition reveals the stories of freedom’s heroes, ranging from Phillis Wheatley to Frederick Douglass to the Tuskegee Airmen.

Story quilting expands on traditional textile-arts techniques to record, in fabric, events of personal or historical significance. 



Contact: Bruce Museum
1 Museum Drive
Greenwich, CT 06830-7157

Tel: (1) 203 869 03 76

More Art and Archaeology Travel Listings:

More United States Travel Listings: